Hesperus

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Hesperus as Personification of the Evening by Anton Raphael Mengs. One of an ensemble of four paintings with personifications of the times of day intended as supraportas for the boudoir of Maria Luisa of Parma, Princess of Asturia, now in the Palacete de la Moncloa as part of the Patrimonio Nacional, Madrid. Oil on canvas, 192 x 180 cm. Date ca. 1765

Hesperus as Personification of the Evening by Anton Raphael Mengs. One of an ensemble of four paintings with personifications of the times of day intended as supraportas for the boudoir of Maria Luisa of Parma, Princess of Asturia, now in the Palacete de la Moncloa as part of the Patrimonio Nacional, Madrid. Oil on canvas, 192 x 180 cm. Date ca. 1765

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

In Greek mythology, Hesperos (The Evening Star), sometimes Latinized as Hesperus) and Heosphoros (Morning Star) Latinized as Eosphorus are sons of the dawn goddess Eos (Roman Aurora). Hesperus' father was Cephalus, a mortal, while Eosphoros' was the star god Astraios. Hesperos Roman equivalent was Vesper. (cf. "west", direction of sunset/dusk/evening star and "east", direction of morning star/dawn/sunrise).

Variant names

Hesperus (Greek Hesperos) is the personification of the "evening star", the planet Venus in the evening. His name is sometimes conflated with the names for his brother the personification of the planet as the "morning star" Eosphorus ("bearer of dawn") or Phosphorus ("bearer of light", often translated as "Lucifer" in Latin), since they are all personifications of the same planet Venus. "Heosphoros" in the Greek LXX Septuagint and "Lucifer" in Jerome's Latin Vulgate were used to translate the Hebrew "Helel" (Venus as the brilliant, bright or shining one), "son of Shahar (Dawn)" in the Hebrew version of Isaiah 14:12.

When named thus by the early Greeks, it was thought that Phosphoros (Venus in the morning) and Hesperos (Venus in the evening) were two different celestial objects. The Greeks later accepted the Babylonian view that the two were the same, and the Babylonian identification of the planets with the Great Gods, and dedicated the "wandering star" (planet) to Aphrodite (Roman Venus), as the equivalent of Ishtar.

Eosphorus/Hesperus was said to be the father of Ceyx and Daedalion. In some sources, he is also said to be the father of the Hesperides.

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To Greek Gods

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