Profession (Wisdom; Trained Only)

This material is Open Game Content, and is licensed for public use under the terms of the Open Game License v1.0a.

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Office of Jacob Fugger; with his main-accountancy M. Schwarz Date 1517 Office of Jacob Fugger; with his main-accountancy M. Schwarz Date 1517

Like Craft, Knowledge, and Perform, Profession is actually a number of separate skills. You could have several Profession skills, each with its own ranks, each purchased as a separate skill. While a Craft skill represents ability in creating or making an item, a Profession skill represents an aptitude in a vocation requiring a broader range of less specific knowledge.

Check: You can practice your trade and make a decent living, earning about half your Profession check result in gold pieces per week of dedicated work. You know how to use the tools of your trade, how to perform the profession's daily tasks, how to supervise helpers, and how to handle common problems.

Action: Not applicable. A single check generally represents a week of work.

Try Again: Varies. An attempt to use a Profession skill to earn an income cannot be retried. You are stuck with whatever weekly wage your check result brought you. Another check may be made after a week to determine a new income for the next period of time. An attempt to accomplish some specific task can usually be retried.

Untrained: Untrained laborers and assistants (that is, characters without any ranks in Profession) earn an average of 1 silver piece per day.

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The Netbook of Witches and Warlocks

By Timothy S. Brannan and The Netbook of Witches and Warlocks Team

Full netbook can be found on the followng website

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The witch can use many of her skills to earn a living. Witches often learn a trade as a local alchemist, healer, mid-wife, or even scholar.

Professions

Criminal Occupations

Court Occupations

Military Occupations

Religious Occupations

Merchants

Alewife

The Ale-House Door, oil on canvas Date ca. 1790

The Ale-House Door, oil on canvas Date ca. 1790

A female alehouse keeper

Apothecary

Banker

Beer seller

Butcher

The Butcher's Shop, oil on canvas painting by Annibale Carracci, early 1580s, Kimbell Art Museum Date early 1580s Annibale Carracci (1560–1609) Link back to Creator infobox template

The Butcher's Shop, oil on canvas painting by Annibale Carracci, early 1580s, Kimbell Art Museum Date early 1580s Annibale Carracci (15601609) Link back to Creator infobox template

Chapman

Travelling merchant

Costermonger

Fruit seller

Fishmonger

Study of Hawaiian Fish, oil on canvas painting by Hubert Vos, 1898, Honolulu Academy of Arts Date 1898

Study of Hawaiian Fish, oil on canvas painting by Hubert Vos, 1898, Honolulu Academy of Arts Date 1898

Fish seller

Fruitier

Fruitseller

Glass seller

glass seller

Person who sellls glass objects

Grocer

Harberdasher

Seller of men's clothing

Hay merchant

Innkeeper

Feuermüller In einer Dachauer Wirtsstube 1855.jpg In einer Dachauer Wirtsstube, Öl auf Lwd., 64,5 x 56,7 cm Date (1855) Moritz Müller (1807–1865)

Feuermüller In einer Dachauer Wirtsstube 1855.jpg In einer Dachauer Wirtsstube, Öl auf Lwd., 64,5 x 56,7 cm Date (1855) Moritz Müller (18071865)

Ironmonger

One who sells things made of iron

Mercer

Merchant

Katsushika Hokusai (1760–1849)

Katsushika Hokusai (17601849)

Oil merchant

Old-clothes dealer

Peddler

Pie seller

Sebastian Stoskopff (1597–1657) Title : Korb mit Gläsern, Pastete und einem Brief Date : um 1640

Sebastian Stoskopff (15971657) Title : Korb mit Gläsern, Pastete und einem Brief Date : um 1640

Poulter

Frans Snyders (1579–1657) Title: Wildbrethändler Date: 2nd quarter of 17th century

Frans Snyders (1579–1657) Title: Wildbrethändler Date: 2nd quarter of 17th century

Seller of poultry

Skinner

Spice merchant

Spicer

grocer or dealer in spices

Taverner

Waterseller

Wine seller

Joseph-Noël Sylvestre (1847-1926) Title: A good drop!

Joseph-Noël Sylvestre (1847-1926) Title: A good drop!

Wood seller

Artists/Entertainers

Bard

Barker

Person who advertises at the entrance to a show

Fiddler

Young man with a violin Date (1710) Jan Kupecký (1667–1740)

Young man with a violin Date (1710) Jan Kupecký (16671740)

Fool

Fortune Teller

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Kartenlegerin Year c. 1508

Kartenlegerin Year c. 1508

(Wisdom, Trained Only)

Fortune Telling can be done for fun, profit or even to aid true divinations. Every rank represents a different type of fortune telling (divination) the character knows. These skills allow the witch (or other classes) to make some divinatory predications. Most are simple guesses and may be used to support the user economically. However this skill may also be used to stack with abilities, feats or spells that confer divination powers.

The most common types of fortune telling are, Astrology (use of the stars), Chiromancy (palm reading), I Ching (special coins), Numerology (by numbers), Spiritual Consultation (asking spirits by means of a special board), Tarot (use of special cards) and Tassography (Tea Leaves). Others, though somewhat less common are, Ceromancy (hot wax or molten lead dropped in water), Coscinmancy (how water runs out of a sieve), Halomancy (by casting salt), Haruspicy (from the entrails of animals), Hieromancy (sacrificing animals), Hydromancy (by water), Lampadomancy (by movement of a flame), Lithomancy (by casting stones or dice), Oneiromancy (by dreams), Phrenology (examining the bumps on a person·s head), Pyromancy (starring into a fire), Sortilege (drawing lots), and Theomancy (by oracles or divine inspiration).

Anyone can make a living as a fortune teller. Witches for the most part view fortune telling as being a true possible outcome and typically believe in the readings they make. bards view fortune telling as another type of performance, entertainment for some and means of income. Rogues are interested in using fortune telling to improve their own futures, by parting would-be marks with their burdensome extra money. Of course individuals can and do vary.

Check: A fortune telling check can be made only if the intended reader is physically present. The DC of the roll determines how much knowledge is gained. Typically the fortune teller will want to know some basic information about the customer first. An astrologer will want to know a birthday or a spiritual consultant will want to know what spirit the customer wants to contact.

Retry: Yes, but it's not always easy to tell if what occurs will conform to what had been determined through the use of this skill. A failed check results in wrong or misleading information. Once the fortune teller realizes she failed, she may retry the check again.

Result: While the true results are always left up to the GM, the table below is a good general indication of what the witch can tell.

Fortune Telling DC
Determination of the basic personality traits of a customer (materialist or spiritual, physical or intellectual, evasive or straightforward, calm or nervous, etc.)
Earnings: 1d10 CP/day
10
Determination of more personal, but not uncommon life events or personally traits. (loss of a parent, “you had a pet as a child that you loved”)
Earnings: 1d10 SP/day
15
Determination of more personal, uncommon life events or personality traits. (“your brother preceded you in death.” “You left on bad terms with your mother.”)
Earnings: 2d10 SP/day
20
Determination of something specific, but minor. (“the ring you lost will be found” “you recently put your trust in a good friend and was betrayed.”) or vague allusions to the future that could come true (“do not trust the man in green.”)
Earnings: 3d10 SP/day
25
Determination of something specific and very important to the customer (“your brother’s killer has a long scar on his face.”) or more specific allusions to future events (“You will discover the killer by the light of a full moon.”)
Earnings: 1d10 GP/day
30
Determination of something very specific to the customer’s present or future. (“You mother’s ring is at the bottom of the well north of town.” “Your brother’s killer is the Baron.”)
Earnings: 2d10 GP/day
35

Special: For every five levels of Profession (Fortune Teller) a spellcaster gains a +2 synergy effect when using Ritual Casting on divination type spells.

The character can add levels of Bluff for a synergy benefit with Perform when doing fortune telling as an act.

GM's Note: Dealing with Fortunes

This skill, because of its dealings with destinies and the future, is a dangerous one and its use might even be restricted when used on PC's. GM's should be aware that this skill could, under the right circumstances, cause much trouble to their hard worked plots, and even be able to spoil events of the future. Truly crafty GM's can use it effectively by playing off the vagueness of the reading. This skill can be good to develop interesting and complex storylines, but too much of a good thing can end up as trouble.

Fresco painter

Glasspainter

Glasspainter

Harper

David_spielt_vor_Saul_die_Harfe Date 16 c Lucas van Leyden (1494–1533)

David_spielt_vor_Saul_die_Harfe Date 16 c Lucas van Leyden (1494–1533)

Illuminator

limner

Illuminator of books

Lutenist

A lute player

Musician

Alexandre-Louis Leloir (1843–1884) Title Interlude musical Date 1874

Alexandre-Louis Leloir (1843–1884) Title Interlude musical Date 1874

Organist

Painter

Honoré Daumier (1808–79), The Painter.

Honoré Daumier (1808–79), The Painter.

Portraits and landscapes

Piper

Player

Playwright

Poet

Sculptor

Sculptor

Singer

Troubadour

A troubadour (Perdigon) playing his fiddle.

A troubadour (Perdigon) playing his fiddle.

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

A troubadour was a composer and performer of Occitan lyric poetry during the High Middle Ages (1100–1350).

The troubadour school or tradition began in the eleventh century in Occitania, but it subsequently spread into Italy, Spain, and even Greece. Under the influence of the troubadours, related movements sprang up throughout Europe: the Minnesang in Germany, trovadorismo in Galicia and Portugal, and that of the trouvères in northern France. Dante Alighieri in his De vulgari eloquentia defined the troubadour lyric as fictio rethorica musicaque poita: rhetorical, musical, and poetical fiction. After a "classical" period around the turn of the thirteenth century and a mid-century resurgence, the art of the troubadours declined in the fourteenth century and eventually died out around the time of the Black Death (1348).

The texts of troubadour songs deal mainly with themes of chivalry and courtly love. Most were metaphysical, intellectual, and formulaic. Many were humorous or vulgar satires. Works can be grouped into three styles: the trobar leu (light), trobar ric (rich), and trobar clus (closed). Likewise there were many genres, the most popular being the canso, but sirventes and tensos were especially popular in the post-classical period, in Italy, and among the female troubadours, the trobairitz.

Tumbler

Writer

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Farming and Workers with Flora and Fauna

Falconer

Geertgen tot Sint Jans

Geertgen tot Sint Jans

breeds, trains, hunts with falcons

Farmer

Farmer

Fisherman

Fisherman

Forester

game warden or forest ranger

Fowler

Person who hunts for wildfowl

Gamekeeper

Richard Ansdell (1815–1885) Title The Gamekeeper

Richard Ansdell (1815–1885) Title The Gamekeeper

Goatherd

Hawker

Breeds, trains, hunts with hawks

Herbalist

Liber Mysterium

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By Timothy S. Brannan and The Netbook of Witches and Warlocks Team

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(Wisdom, Trained Only)

Witches are rumoured to be accomplished herbalists. In any case a witch can make a living concocting herbal cures, homeopathic remedies or even simple spice mixtures for cooking, cleaning or other uses.

Herbalist can identify naturally occurring plants and herbs. She can also prepare simple herbals.

Task DC
Identify common herbs or plants. 10
Mix simple herbal concoctions (spice tea, aromatic herb bundle, curry powders)
12
Brew simple healing potion (heals 1d4 hp) 15

Herbalist can make a living selling her herbal concoctions as per the Profession description.

Special: A person with five or more ranks in Heal gains a +2 synergy bonus with Profession (Herbalist), and vice versa when creating healing balms, ointments or potions.

A person with five or more ranks in Alchemy gains +2 synergy bonus when concocting any alchemical elixir based on naturally occurring herbs.

Horseleech

veterinarian, farrier

Horse trainer

Hunter

Huntsman

Peter Paul Rubens (1577–1640) Date 1615-1616

Peter Paul Rubens (1577–1640) Date 1615-1616

Master of hounds

Molecatcher

Ostler

cares for horses

Oyster raker

worker on an oyster fishing boat

Parker

Caretaker of a park

Plowman

First farm work of the year, sowing and ploughing and suchlike. The castle in the background is Lusignan. Detail from the calendar Les très riches heures from the 15th century. This is a detail from the painting for March.

First farm work of the year, sowing and ploughing and suchlike. The castle in the background is Lusignan. Detail from the calendar Les très riches heures from the 15th century. This is a detail from the painting for March.

Rat catcher

Reaper

Sheepshearer

Shepherd

William-Adolphe Bouguereau Title Pastourelle [Shepherdess]

William-Adolphe Bouguereau Title Pastourelle [Shepherdess]

Swineherd

1559Rose-Marie und Rainer Hagen – Pieter Bruegel d. Ä. – um 1525 - 1569. Bauern, Narren und Dämonen, Köln: Benedikt Taschen Verlag 1999 S. 30 bzw. 37 ISBN 3-8228-6590-7

1559Rose-Marie und Rainer Hagen – Pieter Bruegel d. Ä. – um 1525 - 1569. Bauern, Narren und Dämonen, Köln: Benedikt Taschen Verlag 1999 S. 30 bzw. 37 ISBN 3-8228-6590-7

Thresher

Tillerman

Trapper

Woolcomber

Woolman

Person who sorts wool into differing grades

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Scholars

They may have called it the dark ages for lack of scientific output, but there are still people interested in the world around them, willing to poke and prod it until something broke.

Alchemist

Astrologer

Astronomer

Astronomer

Dean

Librarian

Mathematician

Philosopher

Professor

Scholar

Scholar

Scrivener

Scribe

Tutor

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Sailors

Bargeman

Boatman

Canaller

Canal boat worker

Ferryman

Hobbler

Boat tower on a river or canal

Mariner

Navigator

Pilot

Sailor

Sea captain

Ship's captain

Shipchandler

Ship provisioner

Waterman

Riverboat sailor

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Ordinary People

Almoner

Almoner

A distributer of money and food to the poor

Begger

Crofter

tenant of a small piece of land

Hermit

Housewife

Landlord

Peasant

Pilgrim

Watchman

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Craftsmen

European Guild

Zástava remeslných cechu v N. Strašecí 10.9.2008

Zástava remeslných cechu v N. Strašecí 10.9.2008

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

In the Early Middle Ages most of the Roman Craft organizations, originally formed as religious confraternities, had disappeared, with the apparent exceptions of stonecutters and perhaps glassmakers. Gregory of Tours tells a miraculous tale of a builder whose art and techniques suddenly left him, but were restored by an apparition of the Virgin Mary in a dream. Michel Rouche remarks that the story speaks for the importance of practically transmitted journeymanship.

The early egalitarian communities called "guilds" (for the gold deposited in their common funds) were denounced by Catholic clergy for their "conjurations"—the binding oaths sworn among artisans to support one another in adversity and back one another in feuds or in business ventures. The occasion for the drunken banquets at which these oaths were made was December 26, the pagan feast of Jul: Bishop Hincmar, in 858, sought vainly to Christianize them.

By about 1100, European guilds (or gilds) and livery companies began their medieval evolution into an approximate equivalent to modern-day business organizations such as institutes or consortia. The guilds were termed corps de métiers in France, where the more familiar term corporations did not appear until the Le Chapelier Law of 1791 that abolished them, according to Fernand Braudel[4] The guild system reached a mature state in Germany circa 1300 and held on in the German cities into the nineteenth century, with some special privileges for certain occupations remaining today.

The latest guilds to develop in Western Europe were the gremios of Spain that signalled the progress of the Reconquista: Barcelona (1301), Valencia (1332) and Toledo (1426). Not all city economies were controlled by guilds; some cities were "free". Where guilds were in control they shaped labour, production and trade; they had strong controls over instructional capital, and the modern concepts of a lifetime progression of apprentice to craftsman, journeyer, and eventually to widely-recognized master and grandmaster began to emerge. As production became more specialized, trade guilds were divided and subdivided, eliciting the squabbles over jurisdiction that produced the paperwork by which economic historians trace their development: there were 101 trades in Paris by 1260, [5] and earlier in the century the metalworking guilds of Nuremberg were already divided among dozens of independent trades, in the boom economy of the thirteenth century. In Ghent as in Florence the woolen textile industry developed as a congeries of specialized guilds. The appearance of the European guilds was tied to the emergent money economy, and to urbanization. Before this time it was not possible to run a money-driven organization, as commodity money was the normal way of doing business.
A center of urban government: the Guildhall, London (engraving, ca 1805)

The guild was at the center of European handicraft organization into the sixteenth century. In France, a resurgence of the guilds in the second half of the seventeenth century is symptomatic of the monarchy's concerns to impose unity, control production and reap the benefits of transparent structure in the shape of more efficient taxation. Although many people believe there were guilds for food to travel to soldiers, in Europe during the 16th century there were only craft making guilds

The guilds were identified with organizations enjoying certain privileges (letters patent), usually issued by the king or state and overseen by local town business authorities (some kind of chamber of commerce). These were the predecessors of the modern patent and trademark system. The guilds also maintained funds in order to support infirm or elderly members, as well as widows and orphans of guild members, funeral benefits, and a 'tramping' allowance for those needing to travel to find work. As the guild system of the City of London decayed during the seventeenth century, the Livery Companies devolved into mutual assistance fraternities along such lines.

European guilds imposed long standardized periods of apprenticeship, and made it difficult for those lacking the capital to set up for themselves or without the approval of their peers to gain access to materials or knowledge, or to sell into certain markets, an area that equally dominated the guilds' concerns. These are defining characteristics of mercantilism in economics, which dominated most European thinking about political economy until the rise of classical economics.

The guild system survived the emergence of early capitalists, which began to divide guild members into "haves" and dependent "have-nots". The civil struggles that characterize the fourteenth century towns and cities were struggles in part between the greater guilds and the lesser artisanal guilds, which depended on piecework. "In Florence, they were openly distinguished: the Arti maggiori and the Arti minori—already there was a popolo grasso and a popolo magro". Fiercer struggles were those between essentially conservative guilds and the merchant class, which increasingly came to control the means of production and the capital that could be ventured in expansive schemes, often under the rules of guilds of their own. German social historians trace the Zunftrevolution, the urban revolution of guildmembers against a controlling urban patriciate, sometimes reading into them, however, perceived foretastes of the class struggles of the nineteenth century.

In the countryside, where guild rules did not operate, there was freedom for the entrepreneur with capital to organize cottage industry, a network of cottagers who spun and wove in their own premises on his account, provided with their raw materials, perhaps even their looms, by the capitalist who reaped the profits. Such a dispersed system could not so easily be controlled where there was a vigorous local market for the raw materials: wool was easily available in sheep-rearing regions, whereas silk was not.

Organization

The structures of the craftsmen's associations tended everywhere in similar directions: a governing body, assisting functionaries and the members' assembly. The governing body consisted of the leader and deputies. In Florence of the Middle Ages as consul, officialis or rector, in France as consul, recteur, baile or surposé, in Germany Zunftmeister or Kerzenmeister, in England alderman, graceman or master, depending on the type of Craft.

The guild was made up by experienced and confirmed experts in their field of handicraft. They were called master craftsmen. Before a new employee could rise to the level of mastery, he had to go through a schooling period during which he was first called an apprentice. After this period he could rise to the level of journeyman. Apprentices would typically not learn more than the most basic techniques until they were trusted by their peers to keep the guild's or company's secrets.

Like journey, the distance that could be travelled in a day, the title 'journeyman' derives from the French words for 'day' (jour and journée) from which came the middle English word journei. Journeymen were able to work for other masters, unlike apprentices, and generally paid by the day and were thus day labourers. After being employed by a master for several years, and after producing a qualifying piece of work, the apprentice was granted the rank of journeyman and was given documents (letters or certificates from his master and/or the guild itself) which certified him as a journeyman and entitled him to travel to other towns and countries to learn the art from other masters. These journeys could span large parts of Europe and were an unofficial way of communicating new methods and techniques, though by no means all journeymen made such travels - they were most common in Germany and Italy, and in other countries jorneymen from small cities would often visit the capital.

After this journey and several years of experience, a journeyman could be received as master craftsman, though in some guilds this step could be made straight from apprentice. This would typically require the approval of all masters of a guild, a donation of money and other goods (often omitted for sons of existing members), and the production of a so-called masterpiece, which would illustrate the abilities of the aspiring master craftsman; this was often retained by the guild.

The medieval guild was established by charters or letters patent or similar authority by the city or the ruler and normally held a monopoly on trade in its craft within the city in which it operated: handicraft workers were forbidden by law to run any business if they were not members of a guild, and only masters were allowed to be members of a guild. Before these privileges were legislated, these groups of handicraft workers were simply called 'handicraft associations'.

The town authorities might be represented in the guild meetings and thus had a means of controlling the handicraft activities. This was important since towns very often depended on a good reputation for export of a narrow range of products, on which not only the guild's, but the town's, reputation depended. Controls on the association of physical locations to well-known exported products, e.g. wine from the Champagne and Bordeaux regions of France, tin-glazed earthenwares from certain cities in Holland, lace from Chantilly, etc., helped to establish a town's place in global commerce — this led to modern trademarks.

In many German and Italian cities, the more powerful guilds often had considerable political influence, and sometimes attempted to control the city authorities. In the 14th century, this led to numerous bloody uprisings, during which the guilds dissolved town councils and detained patricians in an attempt to increase their influence.

The example of Chester

In Chester England the earl had given a charter to the guild merchants at the end of the 12th century assuring them of the exclusive rights for retail sales within the city (excepting fairs and some markets where 'foreigners' could pay for the privilege of selling).

Guildsmen had to be freemen of the city. They had to take an oath to serve the city and the king. There were four ways to become a freeman: by apprenticeship of five or seven years, by being born as the son of a freeman (in 1453 dues were remitted to a token 10 shillings 1/2 denarius), by purchasing membership (in 1453 this was 26s8d), or by becoming an honorary freeman as a gift of the assembly.

As well as running local government, by electing the 78 common councillors, the guilds took responsibility for the welfare of their members and their families. They put on the Chester Mystery Plays and the Chester Midsummer Watch Parade. Guildsmen had to attend meetings, often in local inns or in the towers on the city walls. No person of any 'arte, mystery syence, occupacion, or crafte' could 'intermeddle' or practice another trade. In the 15th century the Innkeepers threatened to brew their own beer and the Brewers took them to court and won.

Charters of incorporation were given to each guild, the earliest to the Bakers in 1462. Of the original 25, 19 companies were recorded in 1475. In 1533 another company formed. This was the Merchant Venturers who were the only traders allowed to merchandise in foreign ports and, at first, they were not able to do any manual trade or retail in the city.

In 1694 rules were regularly being broken and it was ordered that 'No man shall have any commerce, Trade or Dealing with any man that shall sett up Stale (stall) or Hake in the street of ye said Citie neither at the ffaire or market but to dispose of his goods at his shoppe or house he keeps all the yeare'. But this was the beginning of the end for the guild's monopoly of city trade.

Shoemaker

Beim Schuhmacher. Öl auf Leinwand. Signiert "Julius Faber" und datiert 1850. 50 x 67 cm Date 1850 Julius Faber (19th century)

Beim Schuhmacher. Öl auf Leinwand. Signiert "Julius Faber" und datiert 1850. 50 x 67 cm Date 1850 Julius Faber (19th century)

Person who makes and repairs shoes

Furrier

Person who makes and repairs goods made of furs - esp. clothes

Tailor

"The village tailor". Oil on canvas, 53 × 42 cm. Kunstmuseum Solothurn. Date (1894) Albert Anker (1831–1910)

"The village tailor". Oil on canvas, 53 × 42 cm. Kunstmuseum Solothurn. Date (1894) Albert Anker (1831–1910)

Person who makes and repairs clothing

Jeweler

Maker of jewelry

Pastrycook

Baker specializing in pastries

Mason

Bricklayer

Carpenter

Carpenter

Person who constructs things from wood

Weaver

De mulieribus claris Date 15th century

De mulieribus claris Date 15th century

Weaver of cloth

Chandler

Person who makes candles

Cooper

Cooper

Person who makes and repairs barrels and tubs

Baker

Baker

Person who makes bread and other baked goods

Scabbard maker

maker of scabbards

Hatmaker

maker of hats

Saddler

maker of saddles

Chicken butcher

butcher of chickens

Purse maker

Maker of purses

Meat butcher

Meat butcher

butcher of all sorts of meats, esp beef

Buckle maker

maker of buckles

Blacksmith

Person who works with iron to form metal implements esp farm tools.

Roofer

Person who makes and repairs roofs

Locksmith

Person who makes and repairs locks

Ropemaker

Maker of rope

Tanner

Preparer of leather

Rugmaker

Maker of rugs

Harness maker

Maker of harnesses

Bleacher

Cutler

Person who makes and repairs cutlery

Glover

Glovemaker

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Less Common Craftsmen

Architect

A designer of buildings and other constructions

Arkwright

a maker of "arks" -- wooden chests or coffers

Armorer

Armorer

Balancemaker

Basketmaker

Beekeeper

Also known as apiarist

Beerbrewer

Beerbrewer

Bellfounder

Casts the large civic bells of the cities

Bellmaker

these are the little bells that go on sleighs and clothing

Blockcutter

Blockcutter

Person who prepares wood for block printing

Bonecarver

Bookbinder

Bookprinter

Bowyer

Brazier

Makes brassware

Brewer

Bricker

brick baker, not mason

Bricklayer

Broderer

Embroiderer

Bronzefounder

Brushbinder

Builder

Buttonmaker

Cabinetmaker

Cardmaker

Cartwright

Carver

Chainmaker

Charcoalburner

Cheesemaker

Clockmaker

Clothier

Cobbler

Shoe Repairer

Coiner

Combmaker

Compasssmith

Confectioner

Coppersmith

Cordwainer

Delver

Ditchdigger

Drycooper

Drywaller

Dyer

Engraver

Makes plates for printing

Fabricshearer

Trims Cloth and makes pleats for customers

Feltmaker

Fletcher

Founder

Foundryman

Fuller

Fuller

Cloth worker who shrinks, beats, presses cloth

Furniture maker

Gemcutter

Girdler

Leather worker who made girdles and belts, chiefly for the Army

Glassblower

Glazier

Goldbeater

Makes gold leaf

Goldsmith

Gravedigger

Grinder

Knife sharpener

Gunsmith

Gunsmith

Gunstocker

Hatter

Person who makes and repairs hats

Horner

Craftsman who works in horn -- spoons, combs, Musical instruments

Joiner

Skilled carpenter

Knifesmith

Lacemaker

Lanternmaker

Lapidary

worker with precious stones,usually other than diamonds

Leadworker

Lensgrinder

Linenspinner

Lorimer

Maker of horse gear

Lutemaker

Mailer

Mailer

Enameller etched decoration onto Plate mail

Mailmaker

Mapmaker

Also known as cartographer

Miner

Miner

Mintmaster

Coin stamper

Nailmaker

Nedeller

Maker of needles

Netmaker

Oilmaker

Papermaker

Parchmenter

Pattenmaker

Pewterer

Pewterer

Physician

Pinmaker

Plasterer

Plattner

sheet metal beater

Plumber

Pot mender

Potter

Printer

Printer

Quarryman

Rectifier

Person who distilled Alcohol

Redsmith

Redsmith

Craftsman who works with brass

Roper

Maker of ropes, nets

Sailmaker

Saltboiler

Salter

Makes or deals in salt

Sawyer

Saws timbers to boards

Scythesmith

Seamstress

Shingler

Wooden roof tiler

Shipwright

Shipwright

"Men from Francisco de Orellana's expedition building a small brigantine, the "San Pedro", to be used for searching for food."

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Shipbuilding is the construction of ships. It normally takes place in a specialized facility known as a shipyard. Shipbuilders, also called shipwrights, follow a specialized occupation that traces its roots to before recorded history.

Shipbuilding and ship repairs, both commercial and military, are referred to as the "naval engineer". The construction of boats is a similar activity called boat building.

The dismantling of ships is called ship breaking.

Silversmith

Silversmith

John Singleton Copley (1738–1815) Title Paul Revere Year 1768

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

A silversmith is a craftsperson who makes objects from silver and/or gold. The terms 'silversmith' and 'goldsmith' should be treated as synonyms: as the techniques, training, history, and guilds are or were largely the same.

Silversmithing is the art of turning silver and gold sheetmetal into hollowware (dishes, bowls, porringers, cups, vases, ewers, urns, etc.), flatware (forks, spoons, knives, etc.), and other articles of Household silver.

Smelter

Smith

blacksmith

Spectaclesmaker

Spurrer

Maker of spurs

Stonecarver

Stonecutter

Swordsmith

Tallowchandler

Tapestrymaker

Thatcher

A thatcher is a person who thatches buildings, i.e. roofs them with reeds or straw.

Thonger

Maker of leather straps or laces

Threadmaker

Tinker

A tinker is an itinerant tinsmith, who mends household utensils.

Tinsmith

Turner

Lathe worker

Typefounder

Vintner

Waxchandler

wheelwright

Wiredrawer

Wiredrawer

Woodcarver

Woodcutter

Woodturner

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Service Occupations

Barber

Barber

Cuts hair shaves and does minor surgery

Copyist

Person who copies books and documents

Doctor

rDoctor

Laundress

Person who owns or runs a laundry also known as lavendar

Maidservant

Porter

Person who carries burdens

Restaurateur

Person who owns or runs a restaurant

Water carrier

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Less common service occupations

Attendent

Bagger

Barrister

Bath attendent

Bather

owner of a bath

Bodyservant

Butler

Carman

Person who drives a vehicle for transporting goods

Carter

Cartier

Chamberlain

Chimney sweep

Clerk

Clerk

Cook

Cowherd

Dairymaid

Woman Milking a Red Cow. 1650s Karel Dujardin (1626–1678)

Woman Milking a Red Cow. 1650s Karel Dujardin (1626–1678)

Dentist

Gerard van Honthorst (1590–1656) Title The Dentist

Gerard van Honthorst (1590–1656) Title The Dentist

Dog trainer

Drayman

Cart driver

Dung carter

Farrier

Groom

Harlot

vagabond, beggar, rogue, loose woman

Herald

Link

Person who will carry a torch to guide people through the night

Maid

Midwifery

Liber Mysterium

The Netbook of Witches and Warlocks

By Timothy S. Brannan and The Netbook of Witches and Warlocks Team

Full netbook can be found on the followng website

Dom of D20 / D&D 3e Netbooks and Downloads.

4th Chapter illustration, a woman giving birth on a birth chair.

4th Chapter illustration, a woman giving birth on a birth chair.

From: Eucharius Rößlin, Der Swangern frawen vnd hebamme(n) roszgarte(n). Hagenau: Gran, um 1515.

(Wisdom, Trained Only)
Midwifery deals with the birthing and care of newborn babies and their mothers. A witch with the midwife skill can aid in birthing, delivery and care of the newborn. The witch can increase the chance a woman will survive the birth. The pregnant woman can add 2 extra points to her own Constitution score because of the witch.

The base DC for delivering a baby is 15.

Task DC
To determine when a baby will be born. 10 To deliver a baby. 15
To deliver twins. (+1 to DC for every multiple baby after 2, i.e. DC19 for triplets).
18
Natal complications (breech birth, baby not breathing)+2
Mother complications (mother not breathing, passing out)+2
Understanding the differences in different humanoid births and practices. (special complications of half-orcs, elven birthing rituals)+2

These modifiers are cumulative.

Retry: Generally, no. A mid wife can recheck the baby’s birth, but previous checks will always bias her; adds +2 to the DC. In other tasks, once the baby is born it’s born.

Miller

Landscape with Windmills, Oil on panel, 1607 (1607) Jan Brueghel (I) (1568–1625)

Landscape with Windmills, Oil on panel, 1607 (1607) Jan Brueghel (I) (1568–1625)

Nurse

Panter

Keeper of the pantry

Paperer

needlemaking industry -- inserted needles into paper to prepare for selling

Pavyler

put up pavilions/tents

Potboy

Cleans out chamber pots

Privycleaner

Procurator or Proctor

A kind of legal agent or representative

Quartermaster

Ragpicker

Sorts through leftover rags, find re-usable ones

Raker

Street sanitation worker

Scullion

Senaschal

Senior steward

Solicitor

Lawyer

Stillroom maid

Surgeon

Tapster

Bartender/barmaid

Wagoner

Wagon or cart driver

Weeper

Wetnurse

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To Skills

The Worlds of Mankind is owned and created by Mark John Goodwin

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