Weapons

Rembrandt (1606-1669) Title The Company of Frans Banning Cocq and Willem van Ruytenburch, known as the Night Watch.
Rembrandt (1606-1669) Title The Company of Frans Banning Cocq and Willem van Ruytenburch, known as the Night Watch.

Without a doubt, weapons number among adventurers’ most coveted possessions. Whether weapons are used as tools to lay foul monsters low, as the medium for magical enhancements, or as outlets for a host of fundamental class abilities, few heroes head into the field without their favorite—or perhaps even a whole arsenal of their favorites. This section presents all manner of nonmagical weapons for PCs to purchase and put to use, whatever their adventures might entail. The weapons presented here should be relatively easy to find and purchase in most towns and cities, although GMs might wish to restrict the availability of some of the more expensive and exotic items.

From the common longsword to the exotic dwarven urgrosh, weapons come in a wide variety of shapes and sizes.

All weapons deal hit point damage. This damage is subtracted from the current hit points of any creature struck by the weapon. When the result of the die roll to make an attack is a natural 20 (that is, the die actually shows a 20), this is known as a critical threat (although some weapons can score a critical threat on a roll of less than 20). If a critical threat is scored, another attack roll is made, using the same modifiers as the original attack roll. If this second attack roll exceeds the target’s AC, the hit becomes a critical hit, dealing additional damage.

Weapons are grouped into several interlocking sets of categories. These categories pertain to what training is needed to become proficient in a weapon’s use (simplemartial, orexotic), the weapon’s usefulness either in close combat (melee) or at a distance (ranged, which includes both thrown and projectile weapons), its relative encumbrance (lightone-handed, or two-handed), and its size (SmallMedium, or Large).

Simple, Martial, and Exotic Weapons

Most character classes are proficient with all simple weapons. Combat-oriented classes such as barbarians, cavaliers, and fighters are proficient with all simple and all martial weapons. Characters of other classes are proficient with an assortment of simple weapons and possibly some martial or even exotic weapons. All characters are proficient with unarmed strikes and any natural weapons they gain from their race. A character who uses a weapon with which he is not proficient takes a –4 penalty on attack rolls with that weapon.

Masterwork Weapons

Simple Weapons
Unarmed Attacks (Simple)
Weapon Cost Damage (S) Damage (M) Critical Range Increment Weight Type Special
Gauntlet 2 gp 1d2 1d3 ×2 — 1 lb Bludgeoning —
Iron
Nails
25 gp 1d4 1d6 18–20/x2 — 1 lb Slashing
or Piercing
—
Iron
Teeth
(bite)
25 gp 1d3 1d4 x2 — 1 lb. Piercing —
Unarmed
strike
— 1d3 ×2 — — Bludgeoning nonlethal
Light
Melee Weapons (Simple)
Weapon Cost Damage (S) Damage (M) Critical Range Increment Weight Type Special
Battle
Aspergillum
5 gp 1d4 1d6 x2 — 4 lb. Bludgeoning see text
Brass
Knife
2
gp
1d3 1d4 19-20/x2 10
ft.
1
lb.
Piercing
or Slashing
fragile
Brass
Knuckles
1 gp 1d2 1d3 x2 — 1 lb. Bludgeoning monk,
see text
Cestus 5 gp 1d3 1d4 19-20×2 — 1lb. Piercing
or slashing
monk
Dagger 2 gp 1d3 1d4 19-20/×2 10 ft. 1 lb Piercing
or slashing
—
Dagger,
punching
2 gp 1d3 1d4 ×3 — 1 lb Piercing —

Gauntlet
Spiked

5 gp 1d3 1d4 ×2 — 1
lb
Piercing
Hook
Hand
10 gp 1d3 1d4 x2 — 1 lb. Slashing disarm
Mace,
Light
5 gp 1d4 1d6 ×2 — 4 lb. Bludgeoning
Sickle 6 gp 1d4 1d6 ×2 — 2 lb. Slashing trip
Stake,
Wooden
— 1d3 1d4 x2 10 ft. 1 lb. Piercing
Stiletto 4 gp 1d3 1d4 18-20/×2 — 1 lb. Piercing
One-Handed
Melee Weapons (Simple)
Weapon Cost Damage (S) Damage (M) Critical Range Increment Weight 1 Type 2 Special
Club — 1d4 1d6 ×2 10 ft. 3 lb Bludgeoning
Club
Mere
2 gp 1d3 1d4 x2 — 2 lbs. Bludgeoning or piercing fragile
Mace,
Heavy
12
gp
1d6 1d8 ×2 — 8
lb
Bludgeoning
Morningstar 8 gp 1d6 1d8 ×2 — 6 lbs. Bludgeoning
and piercing
shortspear 1 gp 1d4 1d6 ×2 20 ft. 3 lb. Piercing
Two-Handed
Melee Weapons (Simple)
Weapon Cost Damage (S) Damage (M) Critical Range Increment Weight Type Special
Bayonet 5 gp 1d4 1d6 x2 1 lb. Piercing —
Longspear 5 gp 1d6 1d8 ×3 9 lb Piercing brace,
reach
Pike,
boarding
8 gp 1d6 1d8 x3 9 lbs. Piercing brace,
reach
Quarterstaff — 1d4/1d4 1d6/1d6 ×2 4 lb Bludgeoning double, monk
Spear 2 gp 1d6 1d8 ×3 20 ft. 6 lb Piercing brace
Spear,
Boar
5 gp 1d6 1d8 x2 8 lb. Piercing brace,
see text
Ranged
Weapons (Simple)
Weapon Cost Damage (S) Damage (M) Critical Range Increment Weight Type Special
Blowgun 2 gp 1 1d2 x2 20 ft. 1 lb. Piercing
Crossbow
Heavy
50 gp 1d10 19-20/×2 120 ft. 8 lb Piercing
Crossbow
Light
35 gp 1d8 19-20/×2 80 ft. 4 lb Piercing
Dart 5 sp 1d3 1d4 ×2 20 ft. ½
lb
Piercing
Javelin 1 gp 1d4 1d6 ×2 30 ft. 2 lb Piercing
Needlestorm 300 gp 1 1 x2 10 ft 2 lb. Piercing
Sling — 1d3 1d4 ×2 50 ft. 0 lb Bludgeoning
Ammunition
(Simple)
Weapon
Cost Damage (S) Damage (M) Critical Range Increment Weight Type Special
Bolts
Crossbow
(10)
1 gp — — 1 lb — —
Bolt(s),
acid
(1)
40 gp — — — 0.1 lb. — see
text
Bolt(s),
Drow poison (1)
100 gp — — — 0.1 lb. — see
text
Bolt(s),
fire
(1)
50 gp — — — 0.1 lb. — see
text
Bullet(s),
groaning
(10)
2 gp — — — 5 lbs. — see
text
Bullets
Sling
(10)
1 sp — — 5 lbs. — —
Bullet(s),
smoke
(10)
100 gp — — — 5 lbs. — see
text
Dart(s),
blowgun
(10)
5 sp — — — 1 lb. — —

 

Martial Weapons
Light Melee Weapons (Martial)
Weapon Cost Damage (S) Damage (M) Critical Range Increment Weight Type Special
Axe,
boarding
6 gp 1d4 1d6 x3 — 3 lbs. Piercing
or Slashing
Axe throwing 8 gp 1d6 ×2 10 ft. 2 lb Slashing
Blade
Boot
25 gp 1d3 1d4 x2 — 2 lbs. Piercing see text
Spiked
Gauntlet
5 gp 1d3 1d4 x2 — 1 lb. Piercing
Gladius
15 gp 1d4 1d6 19-20/x2 — 3 lbs. Piercing
or Slashing
performance
Hammer,
Light
1 gp 1d3 1d4 ×2 20 ft. 2 lb Bludgeoning —
Handaxe 6 gp 1d6 ×3 — 3 lb Slashing
Knife,
Switchblade
5 gp 1d3 1d4 19-20/x2 10 ft. 1 lb. Piercing —
Kukri 8 gp 1d4 18-20/×2 — 2 lb Slashing
Pick,
Light
4 gp 1d3 1d4 ×4 — 3 lb Piercing —
Rondel 8 gp 1d3 1d4 18-20/×2 — 1 lb Piercing —
Sap 1 gp 1d4 1d6 ×2 — 2 lb Bludgeoning nonlethal
Shield
light
special 1d2 1d3 ×2 — special Bludgeoning —
Spiked
armor
special 1d4 1d6 ×2 — special Piercing
Spiked
shield light
special 1d3 1d4 ×2 — special Piercing —
Starknife 24 gp 1d3 1d4 x3 20 ft. 3 lbs. Piercing —
Shortsword 10 gp 1d4 1d6 19-20/×2 — 2 lb Piercing —
War
Razor
8 gp 1d3 1d4 19-20/x2 — 1 lb. Slashing —
Whip,
Cat-o’-nine-tails
1
gp
1d3 1d4 ×2 — 1
lb.
Slashing disarm,
nonlethal
One-Handed
Melee Weapons (Martial)
Martial
Weapons
Cost Damage (S) Damage (M) Critical Range Increment Weight Type Special
Battleaxe 10 gp 1d6 1d8 ×3 — 6 lb Slashing
Cutlass 15 gp 1d4 1d6 18-20/×2 — 4 lbs. Slashing —
Flail 8 gp 1d6 1d8 ×2 — 5 lb Bludgeoning disarm,
trip
Flail,
sprinkling
12 gp 1d6 1d8 x2 — 5 lbs. Bludgeoning disarm,
trip
Longflail 25 gp 1d6 1d8 ×2 — 10 lb Bludgeoning reach
Longsword 15 gp 1d6 1d8 19-20/×2 — 4 lb Slashing
Pick,
Heavy
8 gp 1d4 1d6 ×4 — 6 lb Piercing
Rapier 20 gp 1d4 1d6 18-20/×2 — 2 lb Piercing —
Scimitar 15 gp 1d4 1d6 18-20/×2 — 4 lb Slashing —
Scizore 20 gp 1d8 1d10 x2 — 3 lbs. Piercing —
Shield
heavy
special 1d3 1d4 ×2 — special Bludgeoning —
Side-sword 13
gp
1d4 1d6 19-20/×2 — 3
lbs.
Piercing
or slashing
—
Spatha 10 gp 1d6 2d4 18-20/×2 — 12 lb. Slashing —
Spear,
Dory
10 gp 1d6 1d8 ×3 — 10 lbs Piercing brace
Spiked
shield heavy
special 1d6 ×2 — special Piercing —
Sword
cane
45 gp 1d4 1d6 x2 — 4 lbs. Piercing see text
Terbutje
(Macuahuitl)
5 gp 1d6 1d8 19-20/x2 — 2 lbs. Slashing fragile
Terbutje,
steel
20 gp 1d6 1d8 19-20/×2 — 4 lbs. Slashing —
Trident 15 gp 1d6 1d8 ×2 10 ft. 4 lb Piercing brace
Warhammer 12 gp 1d6 1d8 ×3 — 5 lb. Bludgeoning —
Two-Handed
Melee Weapons (Martial)
Weapon Cost Damage (S) Damage (M) Critical Range Increment Weight Type Special
Bardiche 13 gp 1d8 1d10 19-20/x2 — 14 lbs. Slashing brace,
reach, see text
Bec
de Corbin
15 gp 1d8 1d10 x3 — 12 lbs. Bludgeoning
or Piercing
brace,
reach, see text
Bill 11 gp 1d6 1d8 x3 — 11 lbs. Slashing brace,
disarm, reach, see text
Falchion 75 gp 1d6 2d4 18-20/×2 — 8 lb. Slashing —
Flail
Heavy
15 gp 1d8 1d10 19-20/×2 — 10 lb. Bludgeoning disarm,
trip
Glaive 8 gp 1d8 1d10 ×3 — 10 lb. Slashing reach
Glaive-Guisarme 12 gp 1d8 1d10 x3 — 10 lbs. Slashing brace,
reach, see text
Greataxe 20 gp 1d10 1d12 ×3 — 12 lb. Slashing
Greatclub 5 gp 1d8 1d10 ×2 — 8 lb. Bludgeoning —
Greatsword
50 gp 1d10 2d6 19-20/×2 — 8 lb. Slashing
Guisarme 9 gp 1d6
2d4 x3 — 12 lbs. Slashing reach,
trip
Halberd 10 gp 1d8 1d10 ×3 — 12 lb. Piercing
or slashing
brace,
trip
Hammer,
Lucerne
15 gp 1d10 1d12 x2 — 12
lbs.
Bludgeoning or Piercing brace,
reach, see text

Lance

10
gp
1d6 1d8 ×3 — 10
lb.
Piercing reach
Lance,
blunt
8 gp 1d6 1d8 x3 — 10 lb. Piercing reach
Lance,
barbed
14 gp 1d6 1d8 19-20/x3 — 10 lb. Piercing reach
Maul 45 gp 1d10 2d6 x3 — 10 lbs. Bludgeoning —
Military
Fork
15 gp 1d8 1d10 x3 — 10 lbs. Piercing —
Pickaxe 14 gp 1d6 1d8 x4 — 12 lbs. Piercing —
Ranseur 10 gp 1d6 2d4 ×3 — 12 lb. Piercing disarm,
reach
Sarissa 12 gp 1d6 1d8 x3 — 12 lbs. Piercing brace,
reach, see text
Scythe 18 gp 1d6 2d4 ×4 — 10 lb. Piercing
or slashing
trip
Spear,
syringe
100 gp 1d6 1d8 x3 20 ft. 6 lbs. Piercing , see
text
Ranged
Weapons (Martial)
Weapon Cost Damage (S) Damage (M) Critical Range Increment Weight Type Special
Arbalest 100 gp 1d10 2d6 19-20/×2 120
ft.
10
lbs
Piercing —
Amentum — 1d4 1d6 x2 50
ft.
1 lb. Piercing performance
Chakram 1 gp 1d6 1d8 x2 30 ft. 1 lb. Slashing —
Hunga
munga
4 gp 1d4 1d6 x2 15 ft. 3
lbs.
Piercing —
Longbow 75 gp 1d6 1d8 ×3 100 ft. 3 lb. Piercing
Longbow,
Composite
100 gp 1d6 1d8 ×3 110 ft. 3 lb. Piercing
Pilum 5 gp 1d6 1d8 x2 20 ft. 4 lbs. Piercing see text
Shortbow 30 gp 1d4 1d6 ×3 60 ft. 2 lb. Piercing —
Shortbow
composite
75 gp 1d4 1d6 ×3 70 ft. 2 lb. Piercing —
Arrows (20) 1 gp — — — 3 lb. —
Arrow(s), Blunt (20) 2 gp — — — — 3 lbs. Bludgeoning see text
Arrow, Durable (1) 1 gp see text see text see text see text see text see text see text
Arrow,
Dye
(1)
1 gp see text see text see text see text 4 lbs. — see text
Arrow,
Flight
(20)
2 gp — — — see text 3 lbs. Piercing see text
Arrow,
Lodestone
(1)
10 gp see text see text see text see text see text see text see text
Arrows
Merciless
(10)
50 gp see text see text see text see text 4 lb. see text see text
Arrow,
Pheromone
(1)
15 gp see text see text see text see text see text see text see text
Arrow,
Raining
(1)
30 gp see text see text see text see text see text see text see text
Arrow,
Slow Burn
(1)
150 gp see text see text see text see text see text see text see text
Arrow,
Smoke
(1)
10 gp — — — — — Piercing see text
Arrow,
Splintercloud
(1)
25 gp see text see text see text see text see text see text see text
Arrow,
Tangleshot
(1)
20 gp see text see text see text see text see text see text see text
Arrow(s),
Whistling
(20)
2 gp — — — — 3 lbs. — —

 

Exotic
Weapons
Light
Melee Weapons (Exotic)
Weapon Cost Damage (S) Damage (M) Critical Range Increment Weight Type Special
Aklys 5 gp 1d6 1d8 x2 20 ft. 2 lbs. Bludgeoning performance,
trip
Axe,
knuckle
9 gp 1d4 1d6 x3 — 2 lbs. Slashing monk,
performance
Battle
poi
5 gp 1d3 fire 1d4 fire x2 — 2 lbs. fire —
Chaindisc 25 gp 1d3 1d4 x3 — 3 lb Slashing reach
Combat
Cloth
5 gp 1d3 1d4 x2 5 ft 1
lb
Slashing
or Piercing
—
Kama 2 gp 1d6 ×2 — 2 lb Slashing
Dagger,
swordbreaker
10 gp 1d3 1d4 x2 — 3 lbs. S disarm,
sunder
Dirk 10 gp 1d4 1d6 19-20/×2 10 ft. 2 lb Piercing
or slashing
see text
Flying
Talon
15 gp 1d3 1d4 x2 10 ft. 5 lbs. Piercing disarm,
trip
Knife,
butterfly
5 gp 1d3 1d4 19-20/x2 — 1 lb. Piercing
or Slashing
—
Katar,
tri-bladed
6 gp 1d3 1d4 x4 — 2 lbs. Piercing —
Quadrens 8 gp 1d4 1d6 19-20/x2 — 2 lbs. Piercing performance
Nunchaku 2 gp 1d6 ×2 — 2 lb Bludgeoning
Sai 1 gp 1d4 ×2 10 ft. 1 lb Bludgeoning
Siangham 3 gp 1d4 1d6 ×2 — 1 lb Piercing monk
Sica 10 gp 1d4 1d6 x2 — 2 lbs. Slashing performance
One-Handed
Melee Weapons (Exotic)
Weapon Cost Damage (S) Damage (M) Critical Range Increment Weight Type Special
Axe,
hooked
20 gp 1d6 1d8 x3 — 7 lbs. Slashing disarm,
performance, trip
Bladechain 40
gp
1d4 1d6 19–20/x2 — 5
lb
Slashing disarm,
reach, trip
Falcata 18 gp 1d6 1d8 19-20/x3 — 4 lbs. Slashing —
Khopesh 20
gp
1d6 1d8 19-20/x2 — 8 lbs. Slashing trip
Kopis 65
gp
1d6 1d8 18-20/x2 — 5
lb.
Slashing performance
Magnet
Chain
200
gp
1d3 1d4 x2 — 2
lb
Bludgeoning reach
Saw
Flail
50
gp
1d8 1d10 x3 — 3 lb Slashing see
text
Shotel 30 gp 1d6 1d8 x3 — 3 lbs. Piercing performance
Sword
bastard
35 gp 1d8 1d10 19-20/×2 — 6 lb Slashing —
Waraxe
dwarven
30 gp 1d8 1d10 ×3 — 8 lb Slashing —
Waraxe,
dwarven double
60 gp 1d8 1d10 ×3 — 12 lbs. Slashing see text
Whip 1 gp 1d2 1d3 ×2 — 2 lb Slashing disarm,
nonlethal, reach, trip
Two-Handed
Melee Weapons (Exotic)
Weapon Cost Damage (S) Damage (M) Critical Range Increment Weight Type Special
Axe, Orc Double 60 gp 1d6/1d6 1d8/1d8 x3 15 lbs. S double
Battle Ladder 20 gp 1d4/1d4 1d6/1d6 ×2 8 lbs. B trip
Boarding
gaff
8 gp 1d4/1d4 1d6/1d6 ×2 — 8 lbs. Slashing double,
reach, trip
Chain
Spiked
25 gp 2d4 ×2 — 10 lb. Piercing disarm, trip
Claymore 75 gp 2d6 2d8 19-20/×2 — 12 lb. Slashing
Crook 1 gp 1d4 1d6 ×2 5 lbs. B reach, trip
Curve blade, elven 80 gp 1d8 1d10 18–20/×2 7 lbs. S
Dorn Dergar, dwarven 50 gp 1d8 1d10 ×2 15 lbs. B reach
Elven branched spear 20 gp 1d6 1d8 ×3 10 lbs. P brace, reach
Fauchard 14 gp 1d8 1d10 18-20/x2 — 10 lbs. Slashing reach,
trip
Flail
Dire
90 gp 1d8/1d8 ×2 — 10 lb. Bludgeoning
Flailpole 15 gp 1d6 1d8 ×2 10 lbs. S reach, trip
Flambard 50 gp 1d8 1d10 19-20/x2 — 6 lbs. Slashing sunder
Flying blade 40 gp 1d10 1d12 x3 12 lbs. S performance, reach
Garrote 3 gp 1d4 1d6 x2 — 1 lb. Slashing grapple,
see text
Hammer
Gnome Hooked
20 gp 1d6/1d4 1d8/1d6 ×3/×4 — 6 lbs. Bludgeoning
and piercing
Harpoon 5 gp 1d6 1d8 x3 10 ft. 16 lbs. P grapple
Lance,
Dire
20
gp
2d6 x3 — 15
lb.
Piercing reach
Longaxe, dwarven 50 gp 1d10 1d12 ×3 14 lbs. S reach
Longhammer, dwarven 70 gp 1d10 2d6 ×3 20 lbs. B reach
Mancatcher 15 gp 1 1d2 x2 — 10 lbs. Piercing grapple,
reach, see text
Net, snag 30 gp see text see text 10 ft. 10 lbs. P trip, see text
Orc skull ram 15 gp 1d8 1d10 ×3 20 lbs. B reach
Piston maul 70 gp 1d8 1d10 ×2 15 lbs. B see text
Ripsaw
glaive
30 gp 1d8 1d10 x3 — 12 lbs. Slashing reach,
see text
Scarf, bladed 12 gp 1d4 1d6 ×2 2 lbs. S disarm, trip
Scimitar
Two-Bladed
100
gp
1d4/1d4 1d6/1d6 18–20/x2 — 9
lbs.
Slashing double
Scythe
Two-Bladed

120 gp 1d6/1d6 2d4/2d4 x4 — 22
lbs.
Slashing double
Shield
Halberd
150
gp
1d10 2d8 x4 — 22
lbs.
Slashing see text
Spear, totem 25 gp 1d8 1d10 x3 10 ft. 6 lbs. P or S see text
Sword,
two-bladed
100 gp 1d6/1d6 1d8/1d8 19-20/×2 — 10 lbs. Slashing double
Urgrosh,
dwarven
50
gp
1d6/1d4 1d8/1d6 ×3 — 12
lbs.
Slashing
or piercing
brace,
double
Ranged
Weapons Exotic
Weapon Cost Damage (S) Damage (M) Critical Range Increment Weight Type Special
Bolas 5 gp 1d4 ×2 10 ft. 2 lb Bludgeoning
Bola, Brutal 15 gp 1d3 1d4 ×2 10 ft. 2 lbs. B and P trip
Boomerang 3 gp 1d4 1d6 x2 30 ft. 3 lbs. Bludgeoning —
Bow, thorn 50 gp 1d4 1d6 x3 40 ft. 2 lbs. P
Crossbow, crank (heavy) 400 gp 1d8 1d10 19–20/×2 120 ft. 12 lbs. P
Crossbow, crank (light) 250 gp 1d6 1d8 19–20/×2 80 ft. 6 lbs. P
Crossbow,
double
300 gp 1d6 1d8 19-20/x2 80 ft. 18 lbs. Piercing —
Crossbow
Hand
100 gp 1d3 1d4 19-20/×2 30 ft. 2 lb Piercing
Bolts
Crossbow
(10)
1 gp — — — 1 lb —
Crossbow
Repeating
heavy
400 gp 1d10 19-20/×2 120 ft. 12 lb Piercing
Bolts
Crossbow
(5)
1 gp — — — 1 lb —
Crossbow,
launching
75 gp — — — 30 ft. 8 lbs. — see text
Crossbow
Repeating
light
250 gp 1d8 19-20/×2 80 ft. 6 lb Piercing
Bolts
Crossbow
(5)
1 gp — — — 1 lb —
Flask Thrower 25 gp 20 ft. 4 lbs. see text
Grappling hook 6 gp 1d4 1d6 ×2 10 ft. 14 lbs. P grapple
Harpbow 500 gp 1d6 1d8 x3 110 ft 2 lb Piercing see
text
Lasso 1 sp — — — — 5 lbs. — see text
Luna
Blade
300
gp
1d4 1d6 18–20/x2; 10
ft.;
3
lb
Slashing see
text
Net 20 gp — — 10 ft. 6 lb. —
Net
Bolas
70 gp 1d2 1d3 x2 10 ft. 4 lb. Bludgeoning see text
Shield, throwing +50 gp 1d4 1d6 ×2 20 ft. B performance, trip
Shrillshaft javelin 35 gp 1d4 1d6 ×2 30 ft. 3 lbs. P see text
Shuriken (5) 1 gp 1 1d2 ×2 10 ft. ½
lb.
Piercing monk
Sling, double 10 gp 1d3 1d4 ×2 50 ft. 1 lb. B double, see text
Sling
glove
5 gp 1d3 1d4 x2 50 ft. 2 lbs. Bludgeoning —
Sling staff, halfling 20 gp 1d6 1d8 x3 80 ft. 3 lbs. B
Sling, stitched 1d4 1d6 ×2 1 lb. B disarmtrip
(Exotic)
Ammunition
Cost Damage (S) Damage (M) Critical Range Increment Weight Type Special
Little
starstones
(10)
5
cp
1 1 — — 2 lbs. Bludgeoning nonlethal
Sharpstones (10) 1
gp
1d3 1d4 — — 5 lbs. Piercing or Slashing —

Bich’hwa

Also known as the waveblade or “scorpion’s tail,” this short,
double-curved blade has no hilt but features a knuckle guard and can easily
be used in either hand.

 

Features: disarm, monk

 

Bich’hwa 5 gp 1d3 1d4 19-20/x2 — 2 lbs. P or S monk

 

Sword, Butterfly

Light
Melee Weapons (Eastern)
Weapon Cost Damage (S) Damage (M) Critical Range
Increment
Weight Type Special
Butterfly
sword
20 gp 1d3 1d4 19–20/×2 — 1 lb. Slashing monk

Iron Brush

This is an iron-handled version of a scholar’s brush with a sharpened handle.

 

Benefit: Though
it does little damage, it is easily concealed (the wielder gets a +2 bonus on Sleight of Hand skill checks
made to conceal a iron brush on her body) and can be used as a jabbing weapon
or thrown short distances.

 

 

Light
Melee Weapons (Eastern)
Weapon Cost Damage (S) Damage (M) Critical Range
Increment
Weight Type Special
Iron brush 2 gp 1d2 1d3 ×2 10 ft. 1 lb. Piercing —

Section 15: Copyright Notice

Pathfinder Roleplaying Game Ultimate Combat. © 2011, Paizo Publishing,
LLC; Authors: Jason Bulmahn, Tim Hitchcock, Colin McComb, Rob McCreary, Jason
Nelson, Stephen Radney-MacFarland, Sean K Reynolds, Owen K.C. Stephens, and
Russ Taylor.

 

Kerambit

 

This small, curved pull dagger has a metal loop at the base of its handle allowing
it to be secured with a pinky or worn on a string tied in the hair. While relatively
small, the curved blade can create brutal wounds.

 

Benefit: Easily concealed (the wielder gets a +2 bonus on Sleight of Hand skill
checks made to conceal a kerambit on her body), it is a favorite concealed weapon
of ninja and assassins.

 

 

Light
Melee Weapons (Eastern)
Weapon Cost Damage (S) Damage (M) Critical Range
Increment
Weight Type Special
Kerambit 2
gp
1d2 1d3 ×3 — — Slashing —

Section 15: Copyright Notice

Pathfinder Roleplaying Game Ultimate Combat. © 2011, Paizo Publishing,
LLC; Authors: Jason Bulmahn, Tim Hitchcock, Colin McComb, Rob McCreary, Jason
Nelson, Stephen Radney-MacFarland, Sean K Reynolds, Owen K.C. Stephens, and
Russ Taylor.

 

Crook

 

Source Melee Tactics Toolbox pg. 19 

 

Description

 

This common herders tool is a wooden pole with a hooked end. When
using a crook, you can ignore the penalty for not having two hands free when
making a combat maneuver check to initiate a grapple against a creature you
threaten.

 

 

Two-Handed
Melee Weapons (Exotic)
Weapon Cost Damage (S) Damage (M) Critical Range Increment Weight Type Special
Crook 1 gp 1d4 1d6 ×2 5 lbs. B reach, trip

Double Chicken Saber

 

The tip of this 3-foot-long, straight-bladed sword is bent into two staggered,
opposing sharpened spurs that can be used to pull weapons from an opponent’s
hands.

 

 

Two-Handed
Melee Weapons (Exotic)
Weapon Cost Damage (S) Damage (M) Critical Range
Increment
Weight Type Special
Double chicken saber 12 gp 1d4 1d6 19–20/×2 — 3 lbs. Bludgeoning disarm, monk

Section 15: Copyright Notice

Pathfinder Roleplaying Game Ultimate Combat. © 2011, Paizo Publishing,
LLC; Authors: Jason Bulmahn, Tim Hitchcock, Colin McComb, Rob McCreary, Jason
Nelson, Stephen Radney-MacFarland, Sean K Reynolds, Owen K.C. Stephens, and
Russ Taylor.

 

Hooked lance(Martial – Eastern)

Two-Handed Melee Weapons Cost Dmg (S) Dmg (M) Critical Range Weight1 Type2 Special
Source

3 gp 1d6 1d8 ×4 — 10 lbs. P reach, trip PRG:UC

 

Kumade

 

Adapted from a garden rake, the kumade consists of a wood or bamboo pole topped with a metal claw. The rake head doubles as a grappling hook. When a kumade is secured to a surface, such as a rafter or window sill, its handle can be climbed as a 5-foot length of rope.

 

Section 15: Copyright Notice

 

Pathfinder Player Companion: Melee Tactics Toolbox © 2015, Paizo Inc.; Authors: Paris Crenshaw, Ron Lundeen, and David Schwartz.

 

Kumade, Collapsible

 

This weapon acts as a kumade, but the handle consists of bamboo sections held together by a taut rope running through the center. Releasing the rope is a standard action that provokes attacks of opportunity and causes the weapon to collapse into a bundle that fits into a backpack. Reassembling the collapsible kumade requires a full-round action that provokes attacks of opportunity.

 

Section 15: Copyright Notice

 

Pathfinder Player Companion: Melee Tactics Toolbox © 2015, Paizo Inc.; Authors: Paris Crenshaw, Ron Lundeen, and David Schwartz.

 

Gandasa

 

A gandasa is a wide, single-edged dagger on a 2-foot handle and is wielded in combat like an axe. This weapon is also known as an elephant knife because the connection between the blade and the handle is often decorated to resemble a stylized elephant head.

 

Section 15: Copyright Notice

 

Pathfinder Player Companion: Melee Tactics Toolbox © 2015, Paizo Inc.; Authors: Paris Crenshaw, Ron Lundeen, and David Schwartz.

 

Katana

Specifically constructed for samurai, katanas employ multiple types of steel combined in a distinctive forging process. The result are swords noted for their wickedly sharp yet slender, gently curved blades, designed to make graceful hacking strokes capable of severing opponents’ heads and limbs. Though finely balanced, these blades are difficult to master.

 

Benefit: Characters can use a katana two-handed as a martial weapon, but must take the Exotic Weapon Proficiency (katana) feat to use it one-handed

 

Klar

 

The traditional form of this tribal weapon is a short blade bound to the skull of a large horned lizard but but a skill smith can craft one entirely out of metal.

 

Benefit: A traditional klar counts as a light wooden shield with armor spikes. A metal klar counts as a light steel shield with armor spikes.

 

Weapon Feature(s): special

 

Section 15: Copyright Notice

 

Pathfinder Roleplaying Game: Ultimate Equipment (OGL) © 2012, Paizo Publishing, LLC; Authors: Dennis Baker, Jesse Benner, Benjamin Bruck, Ross Byers, Brian J. Cortijo, Ryan Costello, Mike Ferguson, Matt Goetz, Jim Groves, Tracy Hurley, Matt James, Jonathan H. Keith, Michael Kenway, Hal MacLean, Jason Nelson, Tork Shaw, Owen KC Stephens, Russ Taylor, and numerous RPG Superstar contributors

 

Broadsword, Nine-Ring:

 

This broad-bladed weapon has nine heavy rings threaded through its
spine, providing additional weight to add to the force of its impressive chopping
power.

 

 

One-Handed
Melee Martial Weapons (Eastern)
Weapon Cost Damage (S) Damage (M) Critical Range
Increment
Weight Type Special
Broadsword,
nine ring
15 gp 1d6 1d8 ×3 — 4 lbs. Slashing monk

This content was created for the Pathfinder rules by Paizo Publishing
LLC and is part of the Pathfinder RPG product line.

Section 15: Copyright Notice

Pathfinder Roleplaying Game Ultimate Combat. © 2011, Paizo Publishing,
LLC; Authors: Jason Bulmahn, Tim Hitchcock, Colin McComb, Rob McCreary, Jason
Nelson, Stephen Radney-MacFarland, Sean K Reynolds, Owen K.C. Stephens, and
Russ Taylor.

 

Sword, Seven-Branched:

 

This unusual sword has a straight 2-foot-long blade with six shorter L-shaped blades protruding, three on each side in a staggered pattern. The shorter blades can be used to snag opponents’ clothing or armor, or can target weapons in order to disarm them. To snag armor or clothing, the attacker makes a trip attempt. If successful, the victim doesn’t fall prone, but instead is snagged and stumbles forward, leaving the victim flat-footed for the remainder of the round.

 

Knife, Deer Horn

 

This flat, metal weapon consists of two joined crescent-shaped blades overlapping to form a hollow center with four projecting points. The blades can differ in length. One side of the center is wrapped to serve as a grip while the other acts as a guard. Deer horn knives are traditionally used in pairs.

 

Section 15: Copyright Notice

 

Pathfinder Player Companion: Melee Tactics Toolbox © 2015, Paizo Inc.; Authors: Paris Crenshaw, Ron Lundeen, and David Schwartz.

 

Kerambit: This small, curved pull dagger has a metal
loop at the base of its handle allowing it to be secured with a pinky or worn
on a string tied in the hair. While relatively small, the curved blade can create
brutal wounds. Easily concealed (the wielder gets a +2 bonus on Sleight
of Hand skill checks made to conceal a kerambit on her body), it is a favorite
concealed weapon of ninja and assassins.

 

Sword, Dueling

 

These swords are a bit over 3 feet long, very slightly curved, and sharp only along the outer edge.

 

Benefit: A dueling sword may be used as a Martial Weapon (in which case it functions as a longsword), but if you have the feat Exotic Weapon Proficiency (dueling sword), you can use the Weapon Finesse feat to apply your Dexterity modifier instead of yourStrength modifier on attack rolls with a dueling sword sized for you, even though it isn’t a light weapon. You can also wield a dueling sword in two hands in order to apply 1-1/2 times your Strength bonus to damage.

 

Estoc

 

An estoc is a sword about as long as a bastard sword, but designed exclusively for thrusting attacks. Its “blade” is a steel spike with a triangular, square, or hexagonal cross-section. Like the bastard sword, an estoc requires special training to use it one handed, but it can also be wielded as a two-handed martial weapon.

 

When you wield an estoc with one hand, treat it as a one-handed weapon; when you wield an estoc with two hands, treat it as a two-handed weapon. If you can use the estoc proficiently with one hand, you can also use the Weapon Finesse feat to apply your Dexterity modifier instead of your Strengthmodifier on attack rolls when wielding an estoc sized for you with one or two hands, even though it isn’t a light weapon.a

 

Section 15: Copyright Notice

 

Pathfinder Player Companion: Melee Tactics Toolbox © 2015,
Paizo Inc.; Authors: Paris Crenshaw, Ron Lundeen, and David Schwartz.

 

Knobkerrie

 

Freedom Park, Salvokop, Pretoria Author Leo za1

 

Freedom Park, Salvokop, Pretoria Author Leo za1

A knobkerrie, or iwisa, is carved from a single piece of hardwood with a shaft
2 to 4 feet long surmounted by a bulbous knob. The knobkerrie is a traditional
hunting weapon, but it’s also used as a symbol of authority. Many tribal elders
use decorated knobkerries as scepters or canes. A knobkerrie is thrown end-over-end.

 

Benefit(s) If you are proficient,
you gain a +1 bonus on ranged attack rolls with a knobkerrie against opponents
using bucklers, light shields, or heavy shields. If you aren’t proficient with
a knobkerrie, treat it as a club.

 

Section 15:
Copyright Notice

Pathfinder Player Companion: Ranged Tactics Toolbox © 2014, Paizo Inc.;
Authors: David N. Ross, David Schwartz, and Kaitlyn Sprague.

 

Eku

 

Fukibari

 

Fukiya

 

Hanbo

 

Iki
Jime

 

Iron-shod
staff

 

Fighting Fan

 

Jutte
/Jitte

 

Kamayari

 

Kanabo

 

Kodachi

 

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

 

A kodachi is too short to be considered a long sword
but too long to be a Dagger.

 

A kodachi’s length is similar
to that of the wakizashi, and though the blades differ greatly in construction,
the kodachi and the wakizashi are similar enough in size and technique that
the terms are sometimes (mis)used interchangeably. While the kodachi was a set
length, the wakizashi was forged to complement the height of its wielder or
the length of the katana it was paired with, and thus varied. The kodachi also
features greater curvature than a wakizashi, and typically has a longer handle

 

From D&D
Wiki

Created By Eroneko

Date Created: 11/17/2007

 

 

Exotic One-Handed Critical: 19–20/x2
Range Increment:
Type: Piercing
Hardness: 10

 

 

Size Cost1 Damage Weight1 hp
Small 10 gp 1d4 1lb
Medium 10 gp 1d6 2lb

1. The
SRD only gives a means to determine costs and weights of weapons for Large and
Small versions based on the Medium weapons. Any supplied values are the author’s
best determination.

 

A japanese sword about
that can be used by non-Samurai.

 

Kunai

 

A highly stylized kunai, as often portrayed in fiction .

 

A highly stylized kunai, as often portrayed in fiction .

 

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

 

A kunai is an ancient Japanese
kind of gardening tool or trowel. Two variations are the short kunai and the
big kunai It is a good example of a very basic tool which, in the hands of a
martial arts expert, could be used as a multi-functional weapon.

 

The kunai was conventionally
wrought of iron, not steel, cheaply forged and unpolished. The size of most
kunai ranged from 20 cm to 60 cm, with the average at 40 cm. The kunai was used
by common folk as multi-purpose gardening tools and by workers of stone and
masonry. The kunai is not a knife, but something more akin to a crowbar.
The blade was soft iron and unsharpened because the edges were used to smash
plaster and wood, to dig holes and to pry. Normally only the tip would have
been sharpened. The uses to which a kunai was put would have destroyed any heat-treated
and sharpened tool like a knife.

 

Kunai normally had a leaf-shaped
blade and a handle with a ring on the pommel for attaching a rope. This would
allow the kunai’s handle to be wrapped to act as a grip, or when used as a weapon;
to be strapped to a stick as an expedient spear, to be tied to the body for
concealment, or to use as an anchor or piton.

 

Contrary to popular belief,
they were not designed to be used primarily as throwing weapons, though they
can be thrown and cause damage. Instead, they are a thrusting and stabbing implement.

 

As a weapon

 

Many ninja developed weapons
that were merely adapted farming tools, not unlike those used by Shaolin monks
in China. Since kunai were cheaply produced farming tools of a decent size and
weight, and could be easily sharpened, they were readily available to be converted
into simple weapons.

 

As with the shuriken and ninjutsu, the exaggeration persistent in ninja myths played a large role
in creating the current pop culture image of kunai. In the mythology of ninja,
the kunai is commonly portrayed to be a Japanese knife that is used for throwing
as opposed to stabbing.

 

As a weapon it is larger
and heavier than a shuriken, and with the grip
could also be used in hand to hand combat more readily than a shuriken.

 

In addition, it could be
used for Climbing, as either a kind of grappling
hook
, or a piton.

 

There are several varieties
of kunai, including of short kunai, long kunai, narrow bladed types, saw-toothed
types, and wide bladed types. In some cases, the kunai and the shikoro, a wide
bladed saw with a Dagger-type handle, are hard
if not impossible to distinguish.

 

Roleplaying

 

Kunai (DnD Equipment)

 

From D&D
Wiki

Created By Pirate-Sorcerer

Date Created: 7/19/2007

Kunai

Exotic Light Melee Critical: ×2
Range Increment: 30 ft
Type: Piercing or slashing
Hardness: 10

 

 

Size Cost1 Damage Weight1 hp
Small 2 gp 1d3 1/2 lbs 1
Medium 2 gp 1d4 1 lbs 2

1. The SRD only gives a means to determine costs and weights of weapons for Large
and Small versions based on the Medium weapons. Any supplied values are the
author’s best determination.

 

A kunai is a throwing knife
favored mainly by ninjas. You get a +2 bonus on Sleight of Hand checks made
to conceal a kunai on your body. This is added to the list of weapons the ninja
is already proficient with. Although this weapon is called a kunai, any knife
that can be thrown can be referred to as a kunai.

 

Kukri

 

A kukri is a curved blade, about 1 foot in length.

 

 

Light
Martial Melee Weapons (Eastern)
Weapon Cost Damage (S) Damage (M) Critical Range
Increment
Weight Type Special
Kukri 8 gp 1d3 1d4 18–20/x2 — 2 lbs. Slashing —

Section 15: Copyright Notice

Pathfinder RPG Core Rulebook. Copyright 2009, Paizo Publishing, LLC; Author:
Jason Bulmahn, based on material by Jonathan Tweet, Monte Cook, and Skip Williams.

 

Kusari-fundo

 

From Wikipedia, the free
encyclopedia

 

Kusari-fundo is a weighted
short chain weapon that is closely-related to the kusari-gama in application.
It is a close range weapon, ranging between approximately eighteen and thirty
inches (45 to 76 Centimetres) in length. It is generally constructed of a non-reflective
etched steel chain or thick rope for training purposes. This flexible weapon
can be used to strike, snare, or entangle an assailant or their weapon.

 

It is rumored that the
kusari-fundo was invented to disarm, disable or kill attackers of the imperial
castle without bloodshed, as it was considered hallowed ground.

 

As with the kusari-gama
and kyoketsu-shoge, striking attacks with the kusari-fundo utilize the very
end of the weight in motion in order to generate the most leverage and impact.
Striking trajectories include:

 

* Tenchi furi: Rising
or falling vertical strikes;

* Yoko furi: Inward or outward horizontal strikes;

* Happo furi: Inward or outward diagonal strikes; and

* Naka furi: Forward shooting strikes.

 

Roleplaying

 

Kusari-fundo (DnD Equipment)

 

From
D&D Wiki

Created By Eroneko

Date Created: 11/21/2007

 

Kusari-fundo

Exotic Two-Handed Melee Critical: x2
Range Increment: 10 ft
Type: bludgeoning
Hardness: 10

 

 

Size Cost1 Damage Weight1 hp
Small 25 gp 1d4 5 lb.
Medium 25 gp 1d6 10 lb.
Large 50 gp 1d8 20 lb.

1. The SRD only gives a means to determine costs and weights of weapons for Large
and Small versions based on the Medium weapons. Any supplied values are the
author’s best determination.

 

A Kusari-fundo has reach,
so you can strike opponents 10 feet away with it. In addition, unlike most other
weapons with reach, it can be used against an adjacent foe.

 

You can make trip attacks
with the Kusari-fundo. If you are tripped during your own trip attempt, you
can drop the chain to avoid being tripped.

 

When using a Kusari-fundo,
you get a +2 bonus on opposed attack rolls made to disarm an opponent (including
the roll to avoid being disarmed if such an attempt fails).

 

Kusarigama

 

Kusarigama at Iwakuni Castle

 

From Wikipedia, the free
encyclopedia

 

The kusarigama, chain sickle is a Japanese weapon
that consists of kama on a metal chain with a heavy iron weight at the end.

 

Attacking with the weapon
usually entailed swinging the weighted chain in a large circle over one’s head,
and then whipping it forward to entangle an opponent’s spear, sword, or other
weapon, or immobilizing his arms or legs. This allows the kusarigama user to
easily rush forward and strike with the sickle.

 

A kusarigama wielder might
also strike with the spinning weighted end of the chain directly, causing serious
or deadly injury to his opponent while still outside the range of the opponent’s
sword or spear.

 

Kusarigama have also been
employed as anti-siege weapons, with the chain allowing the weapon to be retrieved
after it was thrown downwards at an attacking force.

 

Many fictional accounts
of kusarigama sometimes show fighters swinging the sickle with the chain, rather
than the weighted end. Though entertaining, this is usually not a proper use
of the weapon, as the sickle is likely to bounce off a target without causing
much injury. One of the few exceptions to this is the Houten Ryu discipline
of the kusarigama.

 

From
D&D Wiki

Created By Eroneko

Date Created: 11/21/2007

 

Exotic Two-Handed
Melee Critical:
x2
Range Increment: 10 ft.
Type: slashing
Hardness: 10

 

 

Size Cost1 Damage Weight1 hp
Small 25 gp 1d4 5 lb.
Medium 25 gp 1d6 10 lb.

A Kusarigama has reach,
so you can strike opponents 10 feet away with it. In addition, unlike most other
weapons with reach, it can be used against an adjacent foe.

 

You can make trip attacks
with the Kusarigama. If you are tripped during your own trip attempt, you can
drop the chain to avoid being tripped.

 

When using a Kusarigama,
you get a +2 bonus on opposed attack rolls made to disarm an opponent (including
the roll to avoid being disarmed if such an attempt fails).

 

Kyoketsu shoge

 

From Wikipedia, the free
encyclopedia

 

The Kyoketsu Shoge, which
means “to run about in the fields and mountains”, is a double edged
blade, with another blade attached at 90 degrees to it. This is attached to
roughly 18 feet of rope, chain, or hair which then ends in a large metal ring.
It is thought to have developed before the more widely known kusarigama (sickle
and chain).

 

Almost exclusively used
by the ninja, the kyoketsu shoge had a multitude of useful applications. The
blade could be used for pulling slashes as well as thrusting stabs. The chain
or cord, sometimes made from human hair or horsehair for strength and resiliency,
could be used for Climbing, ensnaring an enemy,
binding an enemy and many such other uses. The long range of the weapon combined
a cutting tool with the capability to strike or entangle an enemy at what he
perceived to be a ‘safe’ distance out of the way. When skilled with this weapon
it could be used to entangle a sword and rip from the opponents hands rendering
him harmless.

 

Kyoketsu Shoge
(DnD Equipment)

 

From
D&D Wiki

Created By Eroneko

Date Created: 11/21/2007

Kyoketsu

Exotic Two-Handed Melee Critical: x2
Range Increment: 10 ft
Type: piercing
Hardness: 10

 

 

Size Cost1 Damage Weight1 hp
Fine * 1 *
Diminutive * 1d2 *
Tiny * 1d3 *
Small 25 gp 1d4 5 lb.
Medium 25 gp 1d6 10 lb.
Large 50 gp 1d8 20 lb.
Huge * 2d6 *
Gargantuan * 3d6 *
Colossal * 4d6 *

1. The
SRD only gives a means to determine costs and weights of weapons for Large and
Small versions based on the Medium weapons. Any supplied values are the author’s
best determination.

 

A Kyoketsu has reach, so
you can strike opponents 10 feet away with it. In addition, unlike most other
weapons with reach, it can be used against an adjacent foe.

 

You can make trip attacks
with the Kyoketsu. If you are tripped during your own trip attempt, you can
drop the chain to avoid being tripped.

 

When using a Kyoketsu,
you get a +2 bonus on opposed attack rolls made to disarm an opponent (including
the roll to avoid being disarmed if such an attempt fails).

 

Lungchuan Tamo (Hidden
Daggers)

 

What appears to be an ordinary
baton sheaths a pair of matching slender-bladed daggers, perfectly balanced
throwing blades.

 

 

Light
Martial Melee Weapons (Eastern)
Weapon Cost Damage (S) Damage (M) Critical Range
Increment
Weight Type Special
Lungchuan
tamo
5 gp 1d3 1d4 x2 10 ft. 1 lb. Slashing
or piercing
Monk

Section 15:
Copyright Notice

Pathfinder Roleplaying Game Ultimate Combat. © 2011, Paizo Publishing,
LLC; Authors: Jason Bulmahn, Tim Hitchcock, Colin McComb, Rob McCreary, Jason
Nelson, Stephen Radney-MacFarland, Sean K Reynolds, Owen K.C. Stephens, and
Russ Taylor.

 

Manriki

 

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

 

Manriki is a traditional
Japanese throwing chain, generally about 11 inches long. It belongs to the broad
class of chain weapons. When used with a whipping motion of the wrist, it can
injure or knock out opponents at a considerable distance. Some manriki are made
with chains as long as 3 to 6 feet with weights on the ends. They are common
to the ninjutsu style. They are quite versatile weapons that are viable non-projectile
weapons as well as projectile weapons. They are quite similar to the kobudo
Surujin.

 

The chain is generally
held concealed in the hand until the attacker approaches within distance. One
of the weighted ends can then be launched at the opponent, or the defender can
get in closer and use the weights at close range to punch and entangle the attacker
in the chain.

 

The Manriki was very useful
in direct combat against swords. It was strong enough to stop a slash from a
sword blade when the ends were held in each hand and then tangle the arms and/or
neck of the swordsman.

 

Its ability to be easily
concealed in the hand or on the person made it a very popular weapon where a
more obvious weapon may be forbidden. It was sometimes used by guards when they
had to protect an area where the spilling of blood was forbidden. It also makes
a good fashion statement when dealing with people of considerable aggression.

 

Roleplaying

 

Mankiri (DnD Equipment)

 

From D&D
Wiki

Created By Eroneko

Date Created: 11/21/2007

Mankiri

Exotic Two-Handed Melee Critical: x2
Range Increment:
Type: bludgeoning
Hardness: 5

 

 

Size Cost1 Damage Weight1 hp
Small 12 gp 1d4 5 lb.
Medium 12 gp 1d6 10 lb.

1. The
SRD only gives a means to determine costs and weights of weapons for Large and
Small versions based on the Medium weapons. Any supplied values are the author’s
best determination.

 

Mankiri is a special ninja
chain weapon. A ninja gains +2 to Sleight
of Hand
to draw a hidden Makiri or hide it.

 

Manriki-gusari

 

From Wikipedia, the free
encyclopedia

 

The Manrikigusari or Kusarifundo
is a traditional Japanese chain weapon with two steel-weights on the ends designed
to strike, ensnare or trap an opponent. One tactic was to bunch the chain in
a fist and fling one weighted end into the face, groin or solar plexus of an
opponent, quickly and discreetly disabling or even killing them. Typical Manrikigusaris
are approximately three feet long. These weapons are one of the traditional
weapons of Ninjutsu. The manriki gusari could also be thrown before drawing
another weapon, thus possibly confusing, or surprising your enemy. Many forms
taught to hit directly with only one swing, so that your opponent would not
expect the blow.

 

Additional applications
include the composite use of a stabbing weapon (“spike and chain”)
in conjunction with the chain weapon. In this usage, the chain component is
typically of longer length (circa 6-10 feet) weighted at both ends, either of
which can be used individually or both of which may be applied simultaneously,
when the user applies a center grip on the chain. When applied in conjunction
with the spike (or knife, e.g., “tonfa”) there is often applied a
complex, circular, swinging/ensaring approach to the application of the weighted
chain coupled with capturing and drawing the opponent into stabbing range. This
composite use of “spike and chain” relies on the speed and reach (longer
chain) to keep the opponent out of close range contact until either a controlling
capture with the chain is accomplished or the opponent is disabled and, in either
case, the spike (or knife) can then be applied to deliver a killing stroke.
This application offers the advantage of highly concealable weapons of very
different capacities that can be used against opponents at short and medium
ranges. Its light weight allows ease of usage.

 

Roleplaying

 

Manriki-Gusari (DnD Equipment)

 

From
D&D Wiki

Created By James Cornforth

Date Created: 2007-11-17

 

Manriki-Gusari

Critical: —
Range Increment:
Type:
Hardness:

 

 

Size Cost1 Damage Weight1 hp
Small 65 gold 1d6 10 lbs 12
Medium 65 gold 1d8 15 lbs 25

A large kama on a chain,
it is used as a reach weapon but can be used against ajacent foes, you must
chose which to use at the beginning of the round (free-action). Can be used
to make trip attacks and disarm attempts, able to drop to avoid the disarm and
the trip.

 

Masakari

 

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

 

The masakari is an ancient
Japanese weapon. This battle-axe was used by the Yamabushi, the warrior monks.
The blade is made of heavy metal with a spike opposite which is attached to
the wooden haft through the means of a socket. The masakari has a weight of
4 kg and is 120 cm long.

 

Roleplaying

 

Masakari (DnD Equipment)

 

From D&D
Wiki

 

Masakiri

Exotic One-Handed Melee Critical: x3
Range Increment:
Type: slashing/piercing
Hardness: 10

 

 

Size Cost1 Damage Weight1 hp
Small 10 gp 1d6 3 lb. 2
Medium 10 gp 1d8 6 lb. 5

1. The
SRD only gives a means to determine costs and weights of weapons for Large and
Small versions based on the Medium weapons. Any supplied values are the author’s
best determination.

 

A japanase Battleaxe with a spike on the opposite side of the blade.

 

Monk’s spade (Martial – Eastern)

Two-Handed Melee Weapons Cost Dmg (S) Dmg (M) Critical Range Weight1 Type2 Special
Source

Hooked lance 3 gp 1d6 1d8 ×4 — 10 lbs. P reach, trip PRG:UC

20 gp 1d4/1d4 1d6/1d6 ×2 — 12 lbs. B or P or S double, monk PRG:UC

 

Naginata

 

Naginata
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

 

The naginata consists of a 6-foot staff affixed to a 2-foot-long, swordlike
slightly curved blade. The shaft is designed to keep the wielder out of reach
from swords and shorter weapons.

 

Feature(s): reach

 

 

Two-Handed
Melee Weapons (Martial – Eastern)
Weapon Cost Damage (S) Damage (M) Critical Range
Increment
Weight Type Special
Naginata 35 gp 1d6 1d8 ×4 — 9 lbs. Slashing reach

Section 15: Copyright Notice

Pathfinder Roleplaying Game Ultimate Combat. © 2011, Paizo Publishing,
LLC; Authors: Jason Bulmahn, Tim Hitchcock, Colin McComb, Rob McCreary, Jason
Nelson, Stephen Radney-MacFarland, Sean K Reynolds, Owen K.C. Stephens, and
Russ Taylor.

 

Nodachi:

 

This very long two-handed weapon has a slender but wickedly sharp
4-foot-long blade at one end. It is predominantly used by ground troops to attack
mounted warriors, and can be used to hack riders from their mounts or set to
receive a charge.

 

Benefit: A nodachi can be used to hack riders from their mounts or set to receive
a charge.

 

Feature(s): brace

 

 

Two-Handed
Melee Weapons (Martial – Eastern)
Weapon Cost Damage (S) Damage (M) Critical Range
Increment
Weight Type Special
Nodachi 60 gp 1d8 1d10 18–20/×2 — 8 lbs. Slashing
or piercing
brace

Section 15: Copyright Notice

Pathfinder Roleplaying Game Ultimate Combat. © 2011, Paizo Publishing,
LLC; Authors: Jason Bulmahn, Tim Hitchcock, Colin McComb, Rob McCreary, Jason
Nelson, Stephen Radney-MacFarland, Sean K Reynolds, Owen K.C. Stephens, and
Russ Taylor.

 

Ono

 

Illustration of an Ono

 

Illustration of an Ono

 

From Wikipedia, the
free encyclopedia

 

Ono is the Japanese word
for an “axe” or a “hatchet”, and as such it is used to describe
various tools of the similar basic structure. As with axes in other cultures,
ono are sometimes employed as weapons. Generally four feet long with a heavy,
over-sized steel blade. The few existing academic references to this weapon
and documentation of extant examples are in connection with the sohei (warrior
monks), who also adapt other agricultural tools as weapons. Ono specifically
designed for military use is of extreme rarity.

 

Ono

 

From D&D
Wiki

Created By Eroneko

Date Created: 11/21/2007

Ono

Exotic Light Melee Critical: ×3
Range Increment:
Type: slashing
Hardness: 5

 

 

Size Cost1 Damage Weight1 hp
Medium 6 gp 1d6 3 lb. 2

1. The
SRD only gives a means to determine costs and weights of weapons for Large and
Small versions based on the Medium weapons. Any supplied values are the author’s
best determination.

 

Ono is an improvised weapon.

 

Otsuchi

 

Print by Utagawa Kunisada (1786-1865)of Father and Son Members of the Forty-Seven Rônin from Chûshingura, the Treasury of Loyal Retainers: The People Involved in the Night Attack (Kanadehon chûshingura: youchi ninzû no uchi), ca. 1845-1860. Color woodblock print, ôban, original c. 15 in. x 10 in. Pictured are Horibe Yahei and his adopted son, Horibe Yasubei, in black-and-white patterned firefighter's disguises and bearing a pike and a wooden sledgehammer.

 

Print by Utagawa Kunisada (1786-1865)of Father and Son Members of the Forty-Seven
Rônin from Chûshingura, the Treasury of Loyal Retainers: The People
Involved in the Night Attack (Kanadehon chûshingura: youchi ninzû
no uchi), ca. 1845-1860. Color woodblock print, ôban, original c. 15 in.
x 10 in. Pictured are Horibe Yahei and his adopted son, Horibe Yasubei, in black-and-white
patterned firefighter’s disguises and bearing a pike and a wooden sledgehammer.

 

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

 

An otsuchi ( large hammer)
is large Japanese wooden hammer with a shaft of about 6 feet. It was mainly
used for forcible entry through castle gates and doors.

 

Roleplaying

 

Otsuchi (DnD Equipment)

 

From D&D Wiki

Created By Eroneko (talk)

Date Created: 11/21/2007

 

Otsuchi

Exotic Two-Handed Melee Critical: x3
Range Increment:
Type: bludgeoning
Hardness: 5

 

 

Size Cost1 Damage Weight1 hp
Fine * 1d2 * 1
Diminutive * 1d3 * 1
Tiny * 1d4 * 1
Small 12 gp 1d6 2–1/2 lb. 2
Medium 12 gp 1d8 5 lb. 5
Large 24 gp 2d6 10 lb. 10
Huge * 3d6 * 20
Gargantuan * 4d6 * 40
Colossal * 6d6 * 80

1. The
SRD only gives a means to determine costs and weights of weapons for Large and
Small versions based on the Medium weapons. Any supplied values are the author’s
best determination.

 

If the weilder of Otsuchi
has a Strength score of 15 or less, it gains -2 penalty to all attack rolls.
When a character is successfully hit with Otsuchi, it must succeed a Balance check or else be knocked down.

 

Sansetsukon (Three-Section Staff)

 

This staff is broken into three 2-foot-long segments that have been chained
back together, allowing the wielder greater flexibility, and allows the weapon
to be swung rapidly to create a defensive block.

 

This content was created for the Pathfinder rules by Paizo Publishing LLC
and is part of the Pathfinder RPG product line.

Section 15: Copyright Notice

Pathfinder Roleplaying Game Ultimate Combat. © 2011, Paizo Publishing,
LLC; Authors: Jason Bulmahn, Tim Hitchcock, Colin McComb, Rob McCreary, Jason
Nelson, Stephen Radney-MacFarland, Sean K Reynolds, Owen K.C. Stephens, and
Russ Taylor.

 

Sansetsukon 8 gp 1d8 1d10 19–20/×2 — 3 lbs. B blocking, disarm,
monk

 

Sasumata

 

Weapons for capturing thieves: on the left tsukubo, in the middle sodegarami and on the right sasumata

 

Weapons for capturing thieves: on the left tsukubo, in the middle sodegarami
and on the right sasumata

 

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

 

The sasumata is a Japanese
mancatcher and firefighting tool. Usually around 2 meters
in length, with a U-shaped head. The pole is often sturdy wood, reinforced
with iron. Small spikes or other sharp protrusions can often be found along
the pole. Together with those other implements
it is part of the sandogu used for both firefighting and law enforcement.

 

History

 

Although some sources place
the origin of the sasumata in the Muromachi period, most sources discuss its
use in the Edo period. Don Cunningham claims that the firefighting version of
the implement was also known as a chokyakusan, rinkaku, tetsubashira, and tokikama.
He goes on to mention that there was a similar weapon in China known as a chang
jiao qian, and sometimes called a Charisma gan or huo Charisma (fire fork), which may
have had a similar firefighting role. The sasumata was used by firefighters
to help disassemble burning buildings, raise ladders, and otherwise assist with
their duties.

 

Law enforcement in Edo
used the sasumata along with the sodegarami (sleeve catcher) and tsukubo (thrusting
pole) as the torimono sandogu to restrain and arrest criminals. The head of
the sasumata would be used to catch around the neck, arms, legs, or joints of
a suspect and detain them until officers could close in and tie them up (using
hojojutsu). Spikes and barbs would be affixed to prevent criminals from grasping
the pole and wresting the weapon from the police officers. These could also
be used to help catch sleeves and clothing, similar to the sodegarami. The opposite
end of the weapon would often have a metal cap, or ishizuki like those found
on naginata and other pole weapons.

 

Roleplaying

 

Sasumata (DnD Equipment)

 

From D&D
Wiki

Created By Eroneko

Date Created: 11/21/2007

 

Sasumata

Exotic Two-Handed Melee Critical: ×2
Range Increment: 10 ft.
Type: blugeoning
Hardness: 5

 

 

Size Cost1 Damage Weight1 hp
Small 5 gp 1d4 4–1/2 lb. 5
Medium 5 gp 1d6 9 lb. 10

Sasumata is an improvised
weapon that deals nonlethal damage.

 

Sasumata has reach, but
cannot attack adjacent enemies.

 

All grapple checks made
by a Sasumata gains +2 situational bonus to the attack roll.

 

Shang Gou

 

Forged in pairs, these
solid metal blades end in curved hooks, while the hand guards are hammered into
outward-facing spiked crescents.

 

Benefit: Both the crescent
and the tip of the hilt are sharpened for combat. They can be wielded as single
weapons or with two-weapon fighting styles. The weapons gain the disarm special
weapon feature when used individually. A pair of shang gou can also be formed
into a single one-handed weapon to gain the trip special feature.

 

 

Light
Martial Melee Weapons (Eastern)
Weapon Cost Damage (S) Damage (M) Critical Range
Increment
Weight Type Special
Shang
gou
6 gp 1d3 1d4 x2 — 1 lb. Slashing disarm
or trip (see text), monk

Section
15: Copyright Notice

Pathfinder Roleplaying Game Ultimate Combat. © 2011, Paizo Publishing,
LLC; Authors: Jason Bulmahn, Tim Hitchcock, Colin McComb, Rob McCreary, Jason
Nelson, Stephen Radney-MacFarland, Sean K Reynolds, Owen K.C. Stephens, and
Russ Taylor.

 

Sibat

 

This weapon is similar
to a shortspear with a flexible rattan or bamboo shaft and an elaborately barbed
head.

 

Benefit: On a critical
hit, the spear grabs flesh or armor. The wielder can then attempt a combat maneuver
check to attempt to grapple its opponent as a free action. This grapple attempt
does not provoke an attack of opportunity from the creature you are attempting
to grapple. While grappling the target with a sibat, the wielder can only move
or damage the target on its turn. The wielder is still considered grappled,
though it does not have to be adjacent to the target to continue the grapple.
If you move far away to be out of the sibat’s reach, you end the grapple
with that action.

 

 

One-Handed
Melee Weapons (Martial – Eastern)
Weapon Cost Damage (S) Damage (M) Critical Range
Increment
Weight Type Special
Sibat 2 gp 1d4 1d6 ×3 10 ft. 2 lbs. Slashing
or Piercing
see text

This content was created for the Pathfinder rules by Paizo Publishing LLC and
is part of the Pathfinder RPG product line.

Section 15: Copyright Notice

Pathfinder Roleplaying Game Ultimate Combat. © 2011, Paizo Publishing,
LLC; Authors: Jason Bulmahn, Tim Hitchcock, Colin McComb, Rob McCreary, Jason
Nelson, Stephen Radney-MacFarland, Sean K Reynolds, Owen K.C. Stephens, and
Russ Taylor.

 

P or S PRG:UC

 

Sodegarami

 

Weapons for capturing thieves: on the left tsukubo, in the middle sodegarami and on the right sasumata

 

Weapons for capturing thieves: on the left tsukubo, in the middle sodegarami
and on the right sasumata

 

From Wikipedia, the free
encyclopedia

 

The sodegarami is a Japanese
pole weapon used to entangle sleeves. Historically, it was usually around 2
meters in length, with multiple barbed heads, facing forwards and backwards.
The pole is often sturdy wood, reinforced with iron. Small spikes or other sharp
protrusions can often be found along the pole, similar to the tsukubo and sasumata.
Together with those other implements it is part of the sandogu used by law enforcement.

 

The sodegarami (literally
‘sleeve entangler’) was used, as its name implies, to entangle the sleeves and
clothing of an individual. This could be done to restrain the individual, who
could then be more easily disarmed or dealt with. Spines and barbs along the
length were there to prevent a criminal from easily grasping the shaft and wresting
the implement away from the arresting officer. Together with the sasumata and
the tsukubo it is one of the three torimono sandogu of the Edo law enforcement.

 

Roleplaying

 

Sodegarami (DnD Equipment)

 

From
D&D Wiki

Created By Eroneko

Date Created: 11/21/2007

 

Sodegarami

Exotic Two-Handed Critical: ×2
Range Increment: 10 ft
Type: piercing
Hardness: 5

 

 

Size Cost1 Damage Weight1 hp
Small 5 gp 1d4 2–1/2 lb. 2
Medium 5 gp 1d6 9 lb. 5

1. The SRD only gives a means to determine costs and weights of weapons for Large
and Small versions based on the Medium weapons. Any supplied values are the
author’s best determination.

 

Sodegarami has reach and
can attack opponent upto 10ft, but can be used against adjacent foes.

 

When Sodegarami is used
to make a grapple check, the weilder gains a +2 situational bonus to the attack
roll.

 

Sword, Tri-Point Double-Edged

 

Topping the head of this 5-foot-long shaft are three long, backward-curved blades
fashioned in the appearance of a blossoming lotus. The unusually large head
is designed to land heavy blows and multiple wounds that open away from each
other.

 

This content was created for the Pathfinder rules by Paizo Publishing LLC
and is part of the Pathfinder RPG product line.

Section 15: Copyright Notice

Pathfinder Roleplaying Game Ultimate Combat. © 2011, Paizo Publishing,
LLC; Authors: Jason Bulmahn, Tim Hitchcock, Colin McComb, Rob McCreary, Jason
Nelson, Stephen Radney-MacFarland, Sean K Reynolds, Owen K.C. Stephens, and
Russ Taylor.

 

Tanto

 

Tanto Mei: Kunimitsu. Complete knife in scabbard shown in views at left; bare blade shown in views on right.

 

Tanto Mei: Kunimitsu. Complete knife in scabbard shown in views at left;
bare blade shown in views on right.

 

From Wikipedia, the free
encyclopedia

 

A tanto is a single or,
occasionally, double edged Dagger with a blade
length between 15 and 30 cm (6-12 inches). The tanto was designed primarily
as a stabbing instrument, but the edge can be used to slash as well. Tanto first
began to appear in the Heian period, however these blades lacked any artistic
quality and were purely weapons. In the early Kamakura period high-quality artful
tanto began to appear, and the famous Yoshimitsu (the greatest tanto maker in
Japanese history) began his forging. Tanto production increased greatly around
the Muromachi period and then dropped off in the Shinto period (“new sword”
period), consequently Shinto period tanto are quite rare. They regained popularity
in the Shin-Shinto Period (“new-new sword” period) and production
increased.

 

Tanto are generally forged
in hira-zukuri, meaning that their sides have no ridge line and are nearly flat,
unlike the shinogi-zukuri structure of a katana. Some tanto have particularly
thick cross-sections for armor-piercing duty, and are called yoroidoshi.

 

Tanto were mostly carried
by samurai; commoners did not generally carry them. Women sometimes carried
a small tanto called a kaiken in their obi for self defense.

 

It was sometimes worn as
the shoto in place of a wakizashi in a daisho, especially on the battlefield.
Before the 16th century it was common for a samurai to carry a tachi and a tanto
as opposed to a katana and a wakizashi.

 

Roleplaying

 

Tanto (DnD Equipment)

 

From D&D
Wiki

Created By Eroneko (talk)

Date Created: 11/21/2007

Exotic Light Melee Critical: 19-20/×2
Range Increment:
Type: piercing
Hardness: 10

 

 

Size Cost1 Damage Weight1 hp
Small 2 gp 1d3 1/2 lb. 1
Medium 2 gp 1d4 1 lb. 2

The Tanto is a Japanese
long Dagger, sometimes seen with a double-edged
blade, and typically utilized as a piercing weapon. Between 6 and 12 inches with short handles
and matching sheaths. Tantos were very popular with noble women and female samurai
because of their ease of concealability; many Tontos are created with handles
and sheaths made to look like a collapsed fan, allowing the holder to be armed,
but appear harmless.

 

Because of the high amount
of diversity between individual swordsmiths and their individual Tantos, many
different types can be acquired by the player. All Tantos grant a +3 to Sleight
of Hand
checks to conceal it on the character’s person, and a +4 to Spot check DCs to identify a disguised Tanto as a weapon. If the Tanto is masterwork,
reflecting a truly masterful creator, these bonuses increase by one (for +4
and +5, respectively).

 

Tekkan

 

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

 

The Tekkan or “iron
sword” is a Japanese weapon.

 

This weapon was a roughly
sword-shaped iron truncheon, equipped with a haft.

 

In 1876, the Meiji government
of Japan passed the Haitorei Edict, often called the “Sword Abolishment
Act”. This law prohibited all Japanese people, including the former members
of the knightly samurai class, from bearing weapons in public. This prohibition
led to a surge in popularity of a number of non-sword weapons, as well as disguised
swords of various kinds.

 

One weapon which became
more popular at this time was the tekkan. The tekkan had always been very popular
with wealthy merchants and farmers,
since such people had previously been prevented by law from carrying or possessing
swords or other edged weapons during the Edo period. The tekkan, bearing no
edge, had always been permitted by law. After the Haitorei Edict came into effect,
members of the Samurai class also began carrying tekkan as self-defence weapons.

 

Tekkan (DnD Equipment)

 

From D&D
Wiki

Created By Eroneko

Date Created: 11/21/2007

Tekkan

Exotic One-Handed Melee Critical: ×2
Range Increment:
Type: bludgeoning
Hardness: 10

 

 

Size Cost Damage Weight1 hp
Small 1d4 1–1/2 lb. 2
Medium 1d6 3 lb. 5

Tekko

 

A tekko, a traditional okinawan weapon to be held with a fist, the straight part being the handle and the bent part enforcing the knuckles on the outside of the fist. own 3D rendering, vectorised 11:30, 30 May 2007 (UTC) Author chris

 

A tekko, a traditional okinawan weapon to be held with a fist, the straight
part being the handle and the bent part enforcing the knuckles on the outside
of the fist. own 3D rendering, vectorised 11:30, 30 May 2007 (UTC) Author chris

 

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

 

The Tekko a “fist
load weapon” increases the mass of the hand so that, given the physical
proportionality between the fist’s momentum and its mass, increases the force
the bearer can deliver. Some “fist-load weapon” may also serve, in
the same manner as the guard on a sword, to protect the structure of the bearer’s
hand.

 

Because weapons were banned
in Okinawa, the Okinawans sought to put otherwise agricultural implements to
martial use.”The use of the horseshoe appears to have originated when Bushi
in Okinawa used the shoes of their horses as make-shift weapons to defend themselves
against surprise attack. “They simply put a horseshoe into the hand to
punch with”). Held as a “U” with the hand in the middle, the
two ends extended outwards).

 

The horse stirrup (“abumi”)
version consists of a semicircle, with two ends connected by a bar. Some think
of this as solely a fist loaded weapon: primarily a form of knuckleduster (brass
knuckles). However, stirrup of Okinawan lineage does not have dividers to separate
the fingers. Furthermore, the traditional stirrup tekko consists of light metal
and wood, whereas modern day manufacturers of the knucklebuster version tend
to focus on heavy metals such as brass.

 

Artisans Crafted
the traditional stirrup upon which the modern design evolved from either wood
or metal and were often made from a piece of flat bar, bent into a horseshoe
shape and held together by a bolt., to form a “D” shape. For weapons
application, would be combatants sometimes enhanced the design by embedding
additional bolts into the horseshoe shape, to inflict greater injury.

 

From D&D
Wiki

Created By Eroneko

Date Created: 11/21/2007

Tekko

Exotic Light Melee Critical: ×2
Range Increment:
Type: bludgeoning
Hardness: 10

 

 

Size Cost1 Damage Weight1 hp
Small 2 gp 1d2 1/2 lb.
Medium 2 gp 1d3 1 lb.

Tiger Fork

 

This long, tridentlike weapon consists of a three-pronged metal fork set upon
an 8-foot-long shaft. It is wielded much like a staff, with the wielder grasping
the shaft from the center and jabbing its forked end.

 

Tiger fork 5 gp 1d6 1d8 ×2 — 8 lbs. P brace, monk

 

Benefit: A Tiger fork can be set to receive a charge.

 

Features: brace

 

This content was created for the Pathfinder rules by Paizo Publishing LLC
and is part of the Pathfinder RPG product line.

Section 15: Copyright Notice

Pathfinder Roleplaying Game Ultimate Combat. © 2011, Paizo Publishing,
LLC; Authors: Jason Bulmahn, Tim Hitchcock, Colin McComb, Rob McCreary, Jason
Nelson, Stephen Radney-MacFarland, Sean K Reynolds, Owen K.C. Stephens, and
Russ Taylor.

 

Tonfa

 

A pair of Tonfa

 

A pair of Tonfa

 

These L-shaped fighting
sticks are good for striking and blocking combinations. The wielder holds the
handle and either spins the stick or strikes with the stick covering the forearm.

 

 

Light
Martial Melee Weapons (Eastern)
Weapon Cost Damage (S) Damage (M) Critical Range
Increment
Weight Type Special
Tonfa 1 gp 1d4 1d6 x2 — 1 lb. Bludgeoning blocking,
monk

This content was created
for the Pathfinder rules by Paizo Publishing LLC and is part of the Pathfinder
RPG product line.

Section 15: Copyright Notice

Pathfinder Roleplaying Game Ultimate Combat. © 2011, Paizo Publishing,
LLC; Authors: Jason Bulmahn, Tim Hitchcock, Colin McComb, Rob McCreary, Jason
Nelson, Stephen Radney-MacFarland, Sean K Reynolds, Owen K.C. Stephens, and
Russ Taylor.

 

Dart, Wushu

 

Benefit: This sharpened wooden spike can be used as a punching weapon but it
is perfectly balanced for throwing.

 

 

Light
Martial Melee Weapons (Eastern)
Weapon Cost Damage (S) Damage (M) Critical Range
Increment
Weight Type Special
Wushu
dart (5)
1 gp 1d2 1d3 x2 10 ft. — Piercing monk

This content was created for the Pathfinder rules by Paizo Publishing LLC and
is part of the Pathfinder RPG product line.

Section 15: Copyright Notice

Pathfinder Roleplaying Game Ultimate Combat. © 2011, Paizo Publishing,
LLC; Authors: Jason Bulmahn, Tim Hitchcock, Colin McComb, Rob McCreary, Jason
Nelson, Stephen Radney-MacFarland, Sean K Reynolds, Owen K.C. Stephens, and
Russ Taylor.

 

Yari


Several yari, including one hafted with a simple crossbar

 

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

 

Yari is the Japanese term
for spear, or more specifically, the straight-headed spear. The martial art
of wielding the yari is called sojutsu. Yari measured anywhere from one meter
to upwards of six meters (3.3 to 20 feet). The longer versions were called omi
no yari while shorter ones were known as mochi- or tae yari. The longest versions
were carried by foot troops (ashigaru), while the samurai usually carried the
shorter versions.

 

Yari were characterized
by a straight blade that could be anywhere from several centimeters long, to
3 feet (0.9 meters) or more. The blades were made of the same high-quality steel
that the swords and arrow-heads of samurai weapons were forged with, and yari
blades were very durable. Over history many variations of the straight yari
blade were produced, often with protrusion on a central blade. Yari blades (points)
had extremely long tangs which were usually longer than the sharpened portion
of the blade. The tang protruded into a hollow portion of the handle. This resulted
in a very stiff shaft and made it nearly impossible for the blade to fall or
break off.

 

The shaft came in many
different lengths, widths and shapes; made of hardwood (nakae) and covered in
lacquered bamboo strips, these came in oval, round, or polygonal cross section.
These in turn were often wrapped in metal rings or wire, and affixed with a
metal pommel (ishizuki) on the butt end. The yari could be considered a much
higher quality weapon than the average spear due to these unique attributes.
Yari handles were often decorated with inlays of metal or semiprecious materials
such as brass pins, lacquer, or flakes of pearl.

 

Various types of Yari points
or blades existed. The most common blade was a straight, flat, design that resembles
a straight-bladed double edged Dagger. This type
of blade could cut as well as stab and was sharpened like a razor edge. Though
yari is a catchall for spear it is usually distinguished between kama yari which
have additional horizontal blades and simple su yari(choku-so). Also yari can
be distinguished by the types of blade cross section: the triangular sections
were called sankaku-yari and the diamond sections were called ryo-shinogi-yari.

 

Yari (DnD Equipment)

 

From D&D
Wiki

Created By Pirate-Sorcerer

Date Created: 5/9/07

Yari

Martial Two-Handed Melee Critical: ×3
Range Increment:
Type: Piercing
Hardness: 5

 

 

Size Cost1 Damage Weight1 hp
Small 11 gp 1d8 5 lbs 5
Medium 11 gp 1d10 10 lbs 10

Yaris are a long, straight-headed
spear from the Orient, often favored by footsoldiers and samurai. A yari has
reach. You can strike opponents 10 feet away with it, but you can’t use
it against an adjacent foe. If you use a ready action to set up a yari for a
charge, you deal double damage on a successful hit against a charging character.
Weapon stats are for the Su Yari

 

Yumi

 

Japanese arrow stand with a pair of Yumi bows.

 

Japanese arrow stand with a pair of Yumi bows.

 

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

 

Yumi is the Japanese term
for bows, and includes the longbow, Daikyu and the shortbow,
hankyu) used in the practice of kyudo, or Japanese archery. The yumi is exceptionally
tall (standing over two meters), surpassing the height of the archer . They
are traditionally made by laminating bamboo, wood and leather. The construction
used may be a Japanese development of the laminated bows widely used for centuries
across Northern Eurasia and in Jomon times in Japan.

 

Yumi, Daikyu (DnD Equipment)

 

From
D&D Wiki

Created By Eroneko

Date Created: 11/21/2007

Daikyu Yumi

Exotic Two-Handed Projectile Critical: ×3
Range Increment: 100 ft.
Type: piercing
Hardness: 5

 

 

Size Cost1 Damage Weight1 hp
Small 75 gp 1d6 1–1/2 lb. 2
Medium 75 gp 1d8 3 lb. 5

The Daikyu is the Japanese
version of the European longbow, and is utilized in much the same way to much
the same effect. The bow is constructed of bamboo, and as such is relatively
lightweight compared to some other bows constructed of solid wood. Typically
the bamboo is cut into strips and then ‘woven’ together in layers around a core
of wood to form a very strong, but quite flexible frame. The construction of
a Daikyu, from the gathering of materials to the weaving and then finishing,
is done by a single person, and it is said that it takes 10 years for a master
bowCraftsman to train himself to create the
perfect bow. Any good bow requires proper care be taken of it or it will fall
into disrepair, but the Daikyu’s construction and Craftsmanship
allows it to be repaired with relative ease.

 

Two hands are always required
to use a bow, regardless of its size. A Daikyu Yumi is too unwieldy to use properly
while riding a horse or other mount, and a character attempting to do so must
take appropriate penalties to their attack roll. A character adds their Strength
modifier, even if negative, to all damage rolls when wielding a Daikyu Yumi.

 

Yumi, Hankyu

 

From
D&D Wiki

Created By Eroneko

Date Created: 11/21/2007

 

Hankyu Yumi

Exotic Two-Handed Projectile Critical: ×3
Range Increment: 60 ft.
Type: piercing
Hardness: 5

 

 

Size Cost1 Damage Weight1 hp
Small 30 gp 1d4 1 lb. 2
Medium 30 gp 1d6 2 lb. 5

You need at least two hands
to use a hankyu yumi, regardless of its size. You can use a hankyu yumi while
mounted. If you have a penalty for low Strength, apply it to damage rolls when
you use a shortbow.

 

Zanbato

 

From D&D Wiki

Created By dinosaurhunter

Date Created: Febuary 8,2009

 

Critical: 19-20/x3

 

Range Increment:

 

Type: slashing

 

Hardness:

 

 

Size Cost1 Damage Weight1 hp
Small 1d10 3lb. 5
Medium 2d6 6lb. 10

A sword resembling a massisive
katana

 

The feat Weapon
Finesse
can be used on this weapon

 

Fire
lance

 

First illustration of Fire Lance And a Grenade, 10th Century, Dunhuang. Appears to be a detail from an illustration of Sakyamuni's temptation by Mara, with the demons at upper right threatening with the fire lance and other weapons while those at lower right tempt with pleasures."The Genius of China", Robert Temple 10th century

 

First illustration of Fire Lance And a Grenade, 10th Century,
Dunhuang. Appears to be a detail from an illustration of Sakyamuni’s temptation
by Mara, with the demons at upper right threatening with the fire lance and
other weapons while those at lower right tempt with pleasures.”The Genius
of China”, Robert Temple 10th century

 

From Wikipedia,
the free encyclopedia

 

The fire lance or fire
spear is one of the first gunpowder weapons in the world.

 

Description

 

The earliest fire lances
were spear-like weapons combining a tube containing gunpowder and projectiles
tied to a Chinese spear. Upon firing, the charge ejected a small projectile
or poison dart along with the flame. These fire lances had a range of only a
few feet. Being a weapon that combines with a spear, it was initially used as
a hand-to-hand weapon with the gunpowder shot designed to give the wielder an
edge in close-quarter combat.

 

Inventors soon saw the
merit in the gunpowder/tube design and fire lances then appeared independent
of the spear.

 

Diagrams, illustrations
and books from the 10th century show the fire lance being used in battle, but
it saw the most prolific usage during early to mid Song Dynasty, when various
northern peoples encroached on Chinese soil. These short-ranged, one-shot, disposable
weapons were often held in racks on city walls and gave Chinese defenders a
tremendous tactical and psychological advantage when fired in volleys. They
were ideal for dealing with enemies trying to scale city walls, or for holding
the enemy at bay behind a breached gate.

 

History

 

The first fire-lances were
seen in China during the 10th century, but by about 1260 they had developed
into a variety of forms and although normally associated with peasant rebels,
regular Song troops also used them, their use by cavalry being described at
the siege of Yangzhou in 1276. They were cheap and popular for several centuries
sometimes being used in racks to defend cities and remained in use until well
after the Ming period. The development of gunpowder in the fire lance to have
enough force to hurl a killing projectile was a key step along the development
of the first true guns.

 

This weapon paved the way
for further improvements to gunpowder weapons and is the direct ancestor of
the modern-day firearm and artillery.

 

The weapon seems also to
have evolved into rockets, which were used as a weapon in their own right.

 

Huochong

 

From Wikipedia,
the free encyclopedia

 

Huochong is a tube-like,
projection firearm. It first appeared in the Song Dynasty and was constructed
of bamboo. The bamboo body was replaced with bronze sometime in the late 13th
or early 14th century. The oldest metal huochong, which is seen by many as the
first known cannon, is a bronze huochong which has an inscription dating back
to 1298. This piece has no certain find context, however, and is therefore disputed
in authenticity. The first certain bronze huochong comes from 1332.

 

Jian

 

A chinese sword, known as Jiàn, with its scabbard.

 

A chinese sword, known as Jiàn, with its scabbard.

 

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

 

The jian is a double-edged
straight sword used during the last 2,500 years in China. The first Chinese
sources that mention the jian date to the 7th century BC during the Spring and
Autumn Period; one of the earliest specimens being the Sword of Goujian. Historical
one-handed versions have blades varying from 45 to 80 centimeters (17.7 to 31.5
inches) in length. The weight of an average sword of 70-centimeter (28-inch)
blade-length would be in a range of approximately 700 to 900 grams (1.5 to 2
pounds). There are also larger two-handed versions used for training by many
styles of Chinese martial arts.

 

In Chinese folklore, it
is known as “The Gentleman of Weapons” and is considered one of the
four major weapons, along with the Gun (staff), Qiang (spear), and the Dao (sabre).

 

Roleplaying

 

Jian (DnD Equipment)

 

From D&D
Wiki

Created By Eiji

Date Created: 11-23-07

 

Jian

Martial One-Handed Melee Critical: 19-20/x2
Range Increment:
Type: Slashing & Piercing
Hardness: 10

 

 

Size Cost1 Damage Weight1 hp
Small 30 1d6 1 lb 5
Medium 30 1d8 2 lb. 10

The Jian is a double-edged
straight sword used during the last 2,500 years in China. It has a hilt to protect
from opposing blades, and is often equipped with a tassel at the end. The Green
Destiny sword from Crouching Tiger Hidden Dragon is an example of one of these
blades.

 

They are very light and
fairly flexible. The Weapon Finesse feat can apply to this weapon as such, even though it is not a light weapon.
Like the rapier, you can’t wield a jian in
two hands in order to apply 1½ times your Strength bonus to damage.

 

Meteor hammer

 

A meteor hammer

 

A meteor hammer

 

From Wikipedia, the free
encyclopedia

This weapon consists of one or two spherical weights attached by a 10-foot chain.
You whirl the weights and wrap them around an opponent’s body.

 

Benefit: If you succeed at a trip attempt with a meteor hammer, you can drag
your opponent 5 feet closer to you rather than knocking her prone.

 

You may use this weapon in two different ways:

 

Meteor: In meteor mode you use it as a double weapon.

Fortress: In fortress mode you cannot use it as a double weapon but gain reach
and a +1 shield bonus to AC.

Switching between these two modes is a free action decided at the start of your
turn.

 

Section 15: Copyright Notice

Pathfinder Roleplaying Game Ultimate Combat. © 2011, Paizo Publishing,
LLC; Authors: Jason Bulmahn, Tim Hitchcock, Colin McComb, Rob McCreary, Jason
Nelson, Stephen Radney-MacFarland, Sean K Reynolds, Owen K.C. Stephens, and
Russ Taylor.

 

Qiang

 

Qiang

 

Roleplaying

 

From D&D
Wiki

Created By Lord Dhazriel

Date Created: 30 March 2009

 

quarterstaff

Martial Two-Handed Melee Critical: ×3

Range Increment: —

Type: Bludgeoning/Piercing

Hardness: 5

 

 

Size Cost1 Damage Weight1 hp
Small 25 1d6/1d4 2 lb. 5
Medium 25 1d8/1d6 4 lb. 10

A Qiang is a double weapon.
You can fight with it as if fighting with two weapons, but if you do, you incur
all the normal attack penalties associated with fighting with two weapons, just
as if you were using a one-handed weapon and a light weapon. A creature wielding
a qiang in one hand can’t use it as a double weapon—only one end
of the weapon can be used in any given round. The first head of the Qiang (the
one dealing more damages) deal piercing damages, while the second deal bludgeoning
damages.

 

The quarterstaff is a special monk weapon.
This designation gives a monk wielding a Qiang special options. Additionally the Qiang, can be affected by Weapon Finesse as if it was a light
weapon. If a Qiang is used as a two-handed it is treated as if it was a spear.

 

Tiger Head Hook
Sword

 

Tiger Head Hook Sword

 

Roleplaying

 

Originally
Posted by

 

Lord Tataraus of the Giant in the Playground Forums.

 

On
this Thread

 

 

Blade Damage Type Crit Special
Primary 1d6 S 20/x2 +4 to trip and disarm
Cross Guard 1d4 S 19-20/x2 When fighting defensively,
using Combat Expertise, or using
total defense: gain +2 shield AC
Hilt Spike 1d4 P 20/x3 May be used while
grappling as a Dagger, -2 to attack outside
a grapple

Counts as one weapon for
enhancements; while a one-handed weapon, you may wield two as if they were light
weapons; may be used with Weapon Finesse,
but not with Power Attack. All bonuses
when wielding two Tiger Head Hook swords stack (i.e. you get +8 to trip and
disarm), but if you opt to drop a weapon due to a failed trip attempt, you must
drop both if you used both bonuses. You may use the hooks to hang on to an outcropping,
branch, etc.

 

Cost: 800gp

 

Tiger Head Hook swords
are always sold as a set of two masterwork weapons,
which is reflected in the above cost.

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