Geomancy

To Fertile Cresent

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Man in Oriental Costume Date ca. (1635) Rembrandt van Rijn and Workshop (Probably Govaert Flinck)

Man in Oriental Costume Date ca. (1635) Rembrandt van Rijn and Workshop (Probably Govaert Flinck)

Occult Lore
Author Keith Baker, Adam Bank, Chris Jones, Scott Reeves, and Elton Robb
Series Lore
Publisher Atlas
Publish date 2002
Pages 240
ISBN 1-58978-021-3
OGL Section 15 occult-lore
Content Puller Mark Gedak

Netbook can be found on the following website

The Grand OGL Wiki

The material below is designated as Open Game Content

Positive Magic Zones

Positive magic zones boost the power of spells and spell-like abilities, much like the Empower Spell feat. Use the following table to determine the exact effects of a positive magic zone. All of the variable numeric effects, such as damage and number of targets, of any spell cast within a positive magic zone are multiplied by the percentage listed. Discard all fractions.

Zone Variable  
Level Multiplyer Special
+1 125%
+2 150%
+3 175% Magical Overload
+4 200% Magical Overload

Positive magic zones usually cannot exceed level +4. When casting spells in strong magic zones — zones of level +3 or +4 — casters must make a level check to avoid losing control of a spell and suffering magical overload. (A level check is required instead of a skill check because a character’s spellcaster level is a better measure of his control over the arcane forces involved here.) To make this check, roll 1d20, adding the character’s spellcaster level and his appropriate attribute bonus — Intelligence for wizards, or Charisma for sorcerers and bards — and compare the result to a DC of 10 + (the spell’s level) + (the zone’s level). A natural 1 on this roll is always a failure, regardless of the character’s level or attribute bonuses. If the level check fails, the caster’s spell will function as intended —
with the variable boost — but he will suffer the effects of magical overload (see below). Effects produced by magic items are not affected by magical overload.

Example: Boras the Inscrutable, a 5th-level sorcerer with a Charisma of 12, casts a web spell from within a level +3 magic zone. To avoid magic overload, she must make a level check versus a DC of 15 (10 + 2 + 3). Boras’ rolls an 11 and adds 5 (her level) and 1 (her Charisma bonus) for a total of 17, beating the DC and narrowly avoiding a magical overload.

When a character loses control of his spells in a positive magic zone, unfettered magic courses through his body with potentially lethal effects. The process takes 1d10 rounds, during which the character is stunned (he loses his Dexterity bonus to AC and can take no actions; foes gain a +2 bonus to hit). As the energies of magical overload surround his writhing form, he receives a temporary Spell Resistance of 15. Roll on the table below to determine the additional effects of the overload. Unless otherwise noted, there is no saving throw to avoid these effects.

1d10 Roll Magical Overload Effect
1
Random Spell: The character involuntarily casts one of his prepared spells in addition to the intended one. The GM should randomly determine the spell and its target. The new spell is boosted by the magic zone. (If the character no longer has any available spells or spell slots, then no spell is cast.) Add one round to the duration of the overload process and roll again on this table the next round.
2
Minor Cosmetic Change: A small part of the character’s appearance takes on an eerie, unnatural aspect. His hair might become a vibrant shade of blue, or his eyes may glow with unholy fire. He suffers a –2 circumstance penalty to most social skill checks. (The GM may waive this penalty when dealing with NPCs who are familiar with the character or accustomed to the supernatural.) This change will disappear after 1d10 days, and can be magically concealed or dispelled.
3
Weakened Body: The character suffers 1d4 points of temporary ability damage to a randomly determined physical score (Strength, Dexterity, or Constitution).
4
Weakened Mind: The character suffers 1d4 points of temporary ability damage to a randomly determined mental score (Intelligence, Wisdom, or Charisma).
5
Major Cosmetic Change: The character’s appearance undergoes a major change. He may grow impressive antlers or a pair of non-functional bat wings. He suffers a –6 circumstance penalty to social skill checks. In addition to drawing unwanted attention, the results should cause a major inconvenience. If the player tries to remove or deface the new additions, he suffers 1d20 hp of damage and must make a Fortitude save (DC10 + the damage suffered) to avoid losing consciousness for 1d12 hours. The next day, the change magically reappears. This change cannot be reversed or concealed by anything less than a wish or miracle.
6 Negative Level: The character suffers one negative level. Lost levels may be restored with a restoration spell.
7
Ravaged Body: The overload leaves the character permanently enfeebled. Until he is restored by a heal, restore, limited wish, wish, or miracle spell, his Strength score is drained to 1.
8
Ravaged Mind: The overload leaves the character permanently befuddled, as if he had been the victim of a feeblemind spell. Until he is restored by a heal, restore, limited wish, wish, or miracle spell, his Intelligence score is drained to 1.
9
Transformation: The character is polymorphed into a randomly determined creature. Use the table for the Reincarnate spell to determine which one. A wish or miracle can restore the character to his original form.
10 Overwhelming Insight: The character is presented with a powerful vision, revealing his place in an infinite and uncaring universe. The experience threatens to overwhelm his psyche. He must make a Will save (DC 25). If successful, the new insight grants him a permanent +1 increase to one randomly determined mental ability score (Intelligence, Wisdom, or Charisma). If his save fails, the character’s psyche is damaged by the vision and he permanently loses one point from one randomly determined mental ability score. The character cannot gain more than one +1 increase to each attribute in this fashion. Further successful saving throws protect him from losses but do not earn additional gains. Ability losses from overwhelming insight cannot drain any one score by more than one point. Lost attribute points may be restored by wish or miracle spells at the rate of one point per wish or miracle.

Negative magic zones weaken the strength of spells, spelllike abilities, and magic item effects cast within their boundaries. Use the following table to determine the zone’s effects on the variable numbers of a spell. As with positive magic zones, discard all fractions after determining the new spell strength.

Zone Variable
Level Multiplyer Special
–1 75%
–2 50%
–3 25% Null Magic
–4 0% Null Magic

Strong negative magic zones — those of levels –3 and –4 — are called null magic zones. When characters attempt to cast spells in these zones, there is a chance that the caster will suffer a random magical effect. When casting in a strong negative magic zone, make a spellcaster level check against DC of 10 + (the spell’s level) + (the zone’s level). (For this formula, disregard the minus sign in the zone’s level.)

A natural 1 on this roll is always a failure, regardless of the character’s level or attribute bonuses. If the level check fails, the caster’s spell will function as intended — though weakened by the variable multiplyer — but he will suffer the effects of null magic (see below). Effects produced by magic items are not affected by null magic, and negative magic zones cannot exceed level –4, at which level the spell is completely nullified as it is cast (all of its variables are automatically 0, and the spell slot is lost as if it had been successfully cast).

Strong negative magic zones can siphon the energy from spellcasters, leaving them pale and enfeebled by null magic. Those who have suffered the draining effects of null magic liken the experience to being violently ill. The magic gushes from the caster’s soul in a series of racking convulsions, leaving him stunned for 1d10 rounds; during this time he receives a temporary Spell Resistance of 15. In addition, the character must roll on the following table. There is no saving throw to avoid these effects.

1d10 Roll Null Magic Effect 

1
Forgotten Spell: The character temporarily loses one spell. For wizards (and other spellcasters who memorize spells) this means forgetting one of the spells memorized for that day, which is then lost as if it had been cast. sorcerers (and other spontaneous spellcasters) lose one spell slot for that day. The GM should randomly determine which spell or spell slot is lost. This is in addition to the spell cast in the negative magic zone. It can be regained normally, through rest and re-memorization.
2
Weakened: The ordeal leaves the character in a weakened mental and emotional state. He suffers a –2 morale penalty to all checks until he gets a full day of uninterrupted rest.
3
Low Confidence: The character’s confidence is shaken. Whenever he attempts to cast the spell that led to the null magic effect, he must make a Will save (DC 20 + spell’s level). If unsuccessful, the spell fails. This kind of spell failure does not lead to further null magic. This effect is permanent, but can be removed by a remove curse or restoration spell.
4
Forgotten Spells: The character temporarily loses 1d6 spells. For wizards (and other spellcasters who memorize spells) this means forgetting one or more of the spells memorized for that day, which are lost as if they had been cast. sorcerers (and other spontaneous spellcasters) lose one or more spell slots for that day. The GM should randomly determine which spells or spell slots are lost. This is in addition to the spell cast in the negative magic zone. They can be regained normally, through rest and re-memorization.
5
Debilitated: The ordeal leaves the character in a severely weakened mental and emotional state. He suffers a –4 morale penalty to all checks until he gets 1d4 full days of uninterrupted rest.
6
Negative Level: The character suffers one negative level.
7
Lost Spell: The character permanently loses one randomly determined spell from his spells known if he is a wizard (or similar spellcaster who memorizes spells), or one 0-level spell slot if he is a sorcerer (or other spontaneous spellcaster). The spell may be relearned normally, by advancing a level or learning it from a scroll. A wish, restoration, or miracle spell can also restore the lost spell.
8
Lack of Confidence: Whenever the character attempts to cast a spell from the same school as the spell that led to the magical drain, he must make a Will save (DC 20 + spell’s level). If unsuccessful, the spell fails. This kind of spell failure does not lead to further null magic. This effect is permanent, but can be removed by a restoration spell.
9
Sickened: The ordeal leaves the character nearly incapacitated He suffers a –8 morale penalty to all checks until he gets 1d4 weeks of uninterrupted rest.
10 No Confidence: Whenever he attempts to cast any spell, the spellcaster must make a Will save (DC 20 + spell’s level). If unsuccessful, the spell fails. This kind of spell failure does not lead to further null magic. This effect is permanent, and can only be removed by a wish or miracle spell.

Dowsing

Using a set of simple tools, you can locate buried minerals, find water, and identify zones of magical energy. Because Dowsing is a kind of extrasensory perception it is a feat rather than a skill.

The tools used for Dowsing can vary greatly from one character to another — a dowsing rod, crystal, or other apparatus should cost at least 1 gp or require at least 6 hours of labor to prepare.

Example: After consulting with the GM, Oddi Squint-Eyes’ player decides that he will use an ordinary compass as his Dowsing tool. By concentrating on the object of his search, Oddi can cause the compass needle to point in the right direction. The GM decides that this will only work with high-quality compasses, costing at least 1 gp.

Example: Yorda Muddyfoot’s player decides that she will Dowse with a simple straight stick. As she nears the object
of her searches, the stick will bend and twist in her hands,
pointing in the right direction. The GM decides that Yorda
will not need to pay for her Dowsing tool, but she will need
to search for 6 hours to find a stick of the appropriate
length, shape, and flexibility.

Dowsing

Once a character finds or purchases his Dowsing tool, he may use it for an unlimited number of searches. It is only if he loses or breaks his Dowsing tool that he must spend the time or money to acquire a new one.
Prerequisites: Wisdom 13+, at least 5 ranks in Search
Benefits: Most mundane characters use Dowsing to locate buried minerals and water. By searching a one square mile area for 6 hours, and making a successful Search check (DC 10), a character can locate buried minerals worth 1d10 gold pieces or one spring capable of supplying water for 1d6 Medium-sized creatures per day. Unusual conditions require the following modifiers to the Search DC, which can stack. If they wish, players can retry failed searches immediately.

After three unsuccessful searches an area is “tapped out;” there is nothing left to find.

Condition DC
Normal Search 10
Specific Search+5
Searching for a specific kind of resource like a larger-than normal spring or a particular precious metal. If successful, this kind of search yields twice the normal amount of minerals or water.
Limited Availability+10
Searching for a limited resource. This includes searching for water in the desert or searching for minerals in an area that has already been carefully mined by someone else.
Small Area +3
If the search area is less than one square mile, add this modifier to the DC of the Search check.
Tiny Area+5
If the search area is less than 50,000 square feet (about the size of a football field), add this modifier to the Search check.
Synergy –3
Apply this modifier to the Search check DC if the character has at least 5 ranks in any one of these
skillsKnowledge (local area), Knowledge (nature), Scry, or Wilderness Lore.
Lack of Tools+10
The character does not have access to his Dowsing tools.

Spellcasters can also use the Dowsing feat to identify the size and strength of a magical zone. In this case, the character makes a Spellcraft check, with a DC that is dependent on the information the spellcaster is looking for (see table below). Modifiers to this DC depend on the zone’s strength, your location, and your Dowsing tools. Each Search takes an amount of time equal to the modified DC in minutes, and can be retried as often as the spellcaster desires.

Task DC
Determine the nature of a magic zone (positive or negative) while standing within its boundaries. 10
Determine the exact strength of a magic zone while standing within its boundaries. 15
Determine the rough size and shape of a magic zone while standing within its boundaries. Results from this test will deviate from the zone’s actual dimensions by 1d4 x 10%. 15
Determine the exact size and shape of a magic zone while standing within its boundaries. 20
Dowsing while standing outside the zone’s boundaries +1 per 5 ft of distance between the character and the magic zone.
Dowsing for a weak zone (levels +/–1) +5
Dowsing for a strong zone (levels +/–3 or +/–4) –5
Dowsing without the proper tools +10

Geomancy [Special]

You may alter the geomantic influences of an area, strengthening or weakening magic zones or creating new ones.
Prerequisites: Spellcaster level 5th+, Dowsing feat
Benefits: You may alter the strength of magic zones or create new magic zones. Creating a magic zone or altering a naturally-occurring magic zone takes one day for each 1000 gp of its base cost; the base cost is (1000 gp for each point of change) multiplied by 1/10 the zone’s area in square feet. You must spend 1/25 of this base price in XP and use up raw materials worth half of the base price. (Remember that most non-magical locations start out at a magic zone level of 0.)

You may also use your skills to entirely undo the work of other geomancers. Doing so costs half the XP, half the raw materials, and half the time it would normally take to make the alteration if it were done on a naturally occurring magic zone. In addition, you must have the ability to actually destroy the physical components of the previous geomancer’s labors. If he altered the geomantic influences of a dwelling by strategically placing a few potted plants and a mirror, this is relatively easy. If he changed the influences of an entire valley by erecting a ring of standing stones and a mighty tower, the process may require considerably more effort.

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To Fertile Cresent

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