Character Concepts

To Barbarian

grey line

The Quintessential Barbarian
Author Robert Schwalb
Series Quintessential Series
Publisher Mongoose Publishing
Publish date 2003
Pages 128
ISBN 1-903980-92-5
OGL Section 15 qbbn
Content Puller {$content}

Netbook can be found on the following website

The Grand OGL Wiki

The material below is designated as Open Game Content

A character concept is like a character background. It provides adventuring and roleplaying suggestions as well as a small mechanical bonus and small mechanical penalty to help further define your character. Character concepts are an optional mechanic and should only be used with the approval of your game master.

Abandoned

Diplomat

Exile

Explorer

Ex-slave

Gladiator

The Quintessential Barbarian
Author Robert Schwalb
Series Quintessential Series
Publisher Mongoose Publishing
Publish date 2003
Pages 128
ISBN 1-903980-92-5
OGL Section 15 qbbn
Content Puller {$content}

Netbook can be found on the following website

The Grand OGL Wiki

The material below is designated as Open Game Content

In many lands, the leadership develops a system of punishment that is both effective and entertaining. As the populace grows frustrated by poor living conditions, lack of food and other resources, the ruling class recognises the need to keep the people happy all the while attempting to restore order to a growing criminal element. One solution is the arena. In these colloseums, warriors battle other warriors, slaves, animals, chariots and even monsters all at the whim of the ruling body. The blood flows freely to the cheers of the audience. Accolades in the forms of flowers, drink and meat and coin fall from the fingers of adoring fans to the professional killers who entertain them. While many of the combatants stem from the criminal elements, many slavers snare potential gladiators in the wild. Their masters train these barbarians to fight against the highly trained professional gladiators. Nevertheless, what the barbarian loses in training, he more than makes up for in anger.

Adventuring: No one chooses to be a gladiator. It is a Profession where death is a guarantee. Many gladiators will earn their freedom by successfully defeating a champion. Guilt-ridden owners may allow these barbarians freedom from the bloody sands of the fighting pits, thereby allowing them to make their way in an alien world through their own devices. Freed gladiators find they do not have the skills to do anything but fight. Thus, adventuring is a logical choice for these characters as it provides them the means to make a living, but also having a substantial enough reward to earn them an early retirement.

Roleplaying: After years of fighting in the pits, the gladiator’s values about life are jaded. He is violent and aggressive, fully confident in his ability in combat. He has little respect for weakness, sensing it as a liability in an adventuring group. Now free, the carnage of the fighting pits haunts him. While he fully embraces the fury of combat, he often rues the outcome of his life and the loss of his heritage.

Benefits: Fighting in the arenas leads to developing a number of non-traditional skills. Gladiators gain access to Bluff (Charisma) and Sense Motive (Wisdom) as class skills. In addition, they often fight with unusual weaponry, so they receive Exotic Weapon Proficiency at first level in a weapon of their choice.

Penalties: Having spent years fighting in the pits, gladiators lose access to the following skills: Craft, Handle Animal, Intuit Direction, Ride, Swim and Survival.

Guide

The Quintessential Barbarian
Author Robert Schwalb
Series Quintessential Series
Publisher Mongoose Publishing
Publish date 2003
Pages 128
ISBN 1-903980-92-5
OGL Section 15 qbbn
Content Puller {$content}

Netbook can be found on the following website

The Grand OGL Wiki

The material below is designated as Open Game Content

Not all barbarians are brutes. Some are capable hunters and trailblazers who navigate the wilderness in an expert fashion. These men and women are guides. Many serve as frontrunners of barbarian war hosts and are responsible for getting the armies to where they need to be. Others hire themselves out to merchant caravans seeking new clients. Guides also serve as trackers, leaving heavier combat for their more militant associates. Regardless of the role the guide plays, he is an extremely adaptable figure and useful to almost any party. Guides know the lay of the land, rivalling rangers in ability. When forced to fight, they prove to be capable warriors, fully prepared to destroy those who threaten them.

Adventuring: As guides are intimately familiar with a particular geographical region, they are most often sought for their ability to travel through inhospitable terrain and their intricate knowledge of the details of a potentially profitable expedition. However, the knowledge of a local glen or meadow does not limit their usefulness. In fact, many guides crave new knowledge, new information about distant lands, making them eager companions for explorers and adventurers alike. Their expertise in geography allows them to find the shortest path to a destination even if they have never before been there.

Role-playing: Being an expert in travelling through unfriendly lands and treacherous terrain, and avoiding hostile enemies, has a tendency to make the guide rather serious. Many prefer the quiet of being a lone wolf, always at the edge of vision and companionship, but never fully giving in to the warmth of fellowship. On the other hand, some guides crave good conversation and friendship and will readily bond to the more personable members of a party. Above all else, guides take pride in their knowledge and skill and are easy to insult if someone calls into question their abilities.

Benefits: Guides are capable trackers due to their preference for, and knowledge of, the outdoors. Guides gain Track as a bonus feat at 1st level. In addition, the following skills are class skills: Hide (Dexterity), Knowledge (Geography) (Intelligence) and Move Silently (Dexterity).

Penalties: As guides are devoted to leading parties to and from danger, they spend much of their time and energy focused on gathering information about the lay of the land. Considering this, they are less martial than other barbarians and they gain the cleric’s base attack bonus instead of progression granted to the default barbarian. Finally, Intimidate is not a class skill for guides seeing as they favour isolation and are less communicative, preferring solitude over bullying.

Lunatic

Plate 17 from Philip Clüver's Germania Antiqua (1616) Date 1616

Plate 17 from Philip Clüver's Germania Antiqua (1616) Date 1616

The Quintessential Barbarian
Author Robert Schwalb
Series Quintessential Series
Publisher Mongoose Publishing
Publish date 2003
Pages 128
ISBN 1-903980-92-5
OGL Section 15 qbbn
Content Puller {$content}

Netbook can be found on the following website

The Grand OGL Wiki

The material below is designated as Open Game Content

Hearing voices, seeing phantoms, perhaps even witnessing the face of a god, the lunatic is a raving madman. While he has moments of lucidity, which allows him to be a suitable companion, mostly, it is in the throes of passion, the most heated of emotions, when his true nature emerges. Unlike many barbarians, this concept does not always originate from a savage society. In fact, many simply are products of a society ill-equipped to assist mental sickness. Considering the lack of ability to aid these poor souls, people suspect them possessed, diseased or cursed. Not all individuals who are mad have barbarian traits; only those who have uncontrollable outbursts of anger.

Adventuring: Considering the superstitions surrounding mental sickness, especially in a fantasy setting, these barbarians have little reason to stay in a place of persecution. Most will leave and wander the wilderness as hermits, where they cannot hurt anyone beyond themselves. A party of adventurers stumbling upon such a disaffected warrior may take pity on his deplorable state and invite the character to join them. Other barbarians, similarly afflicted, will embark on great epic quests, believing they alone are the chosen of a hidden communiqué with some otherworldly source. Conspiracies, impossible dangers, or simply the lures of strange creatures are all reasons for the lunatic barbarian to adventure.

Roleplaying: The lunatic suffers frequent changes of mood from paranoia to suicidal overconfidence. He will hold to odd fancies about the world’s cosmology. Despite his bizarre moods and outlooks, he is staunchly loyal to his companions, rising to their defence at even the smallest insult. Sporadic and often dangerous, the lunatic is a mixed blessing in any party. On the one hand, he is a competent warrior, but on the other, he is uncontrollable.

Benefits: Never fully stable to begin with, the lunatic is a monster in combat. Whenever he rages, he gains a +6 to Strength and Constitution and he gains a +4 morale bonus to Will saves. He also gains the Frenzy ability, which allows him to fight until he reaches -10 hit points. He may only take advantage of this ability when enraged.

Penalties: Though a frightening combatant to behold, he cares little for his own safety whenever the he enters a rage. Thus, he suffers a -4 penalty to his AC. The lunatic barbarian also receives only (2 + Intelligence modifier) x 4 skill points at first level. Thereafter he gains 2 + Intelligence modifier at each additional level. Lunatic barbarians lose access to Handle Animal and Survival as class skills, lastly the Games Master should select one or two uncommon stimuli which will automatically provoke a rage in the lunatic, such as being confronted by an ethereal creature.

Manhunter

Britomart Redeems Faire Amoret by William Etty.

Britomart Redeems Faire Amoret by William Etty.

The Quintessential Barbarian
Author Robert Schwalb
Series Quintessential Series
Publisher Mongoose Publishing
Publish date 2003
Pages 128
ISBN 1-903980-92-5
OGL Section 15 qbbn
Content Puller {$content}

Netbook can be found on the following website

The Grand OGL Wiki

The material below is designated as Open Game Content

Deep in the verdant jungles of the south lurk sprawling cities, where women have thrown off the chains of male supremacy and seized control of their own destiny. Like the infamous amazons, these women are both alluring and frightening. According to myth, amazons were so masculine and threatening they cut off their left breasts to become better archers. Hence the name amazon (which connotes one breasted). Manhunter cultures can be located anywhere in the campaign setting, for in most cases they wish to remain anonymous. Their societies should be enigmatic and virtually unknown, thus allowing Games Masters an easy time insofar as placement in an extant setting. Manhunters are not exactly anti-male; instead they view men as inferior to themselves. The male gender serves no obvious purpose, aside from breeding.

Adventuring: A manhunter leaves the folds of her community for many of the same reasons as any other adventurer. Feeling restricted in her homeland, or filled with wanderlust, or even simply lusting after treasure and excitement. The motivations are endless. What differentiates her from other barbarians is gender. Manhunters are exclusively female and they are experts at combating men. While this does not prevent them from adventuring with the opposite gender, they prefer not to.

Roleplaying: Manhunters exude superiority over men, which in male-dominated societies can be alarming and even
a bit offensive. They view men as chattel and will openly comment on their virtues or flaws. Beyond the amusing opportunities for role-playing, man hunters are competent warriors, peerless in battle against male creatures. They will always defend oppressed women and, in doing so, exhibit a defined set of ethics and nobility.

Benefits: Manhunters automatically gain the benefits of a Favoured Enemy towards all members of the male gender. At first level, the bonus to damage and Bluff, Listen, Sense Motive, Spot and Wilderness Lore checks are +1. This bonus increases by +1 every five levels. Furthermore, manhunters automatically receive Weapon Focus (longbow) as a bonus feat and a +2 competence bonus to all Ride (Dexterity)checks. Should the manhunter gain the Favoured Enemy ability through multiclassing into another class, or prestige class then, when facing male members of their other favoured enemy, their bonuses stack.

Penalties: Manhunters are inept and virtually useless at dealing with men. They receive a -4 competence penalty to Diplomacy checks when dealing with members of the opposite sex. Furthermore, their behaviour and attitude will soon result in any man they meet being Unfriendly. Lastly, manhunters lose the Fast Movement ability and they rage one less time per day than normal. Therefore, they do not rage at 1st level. They must wait until 4th level to gain this ability.

Noble

Gizur and the Huns Peter Nicolai Arbo (1831-1892)

Gizur and the Huns Peter Nicolai Arbo (1831-1892)

The Quintessential Barbarian
Author Robert Schwalb
Series Quintessential Series
Publisher Mongoose Publishing
Publish date 2003
Pages 128
ISBN 1-903980-92-5
OGL Section 15 qbbn
Content Puller {$content}

Netbook can be found on the following website

The Grand OGL Wiki

The material below is designated as Open Game Content

Nobility for barbarians is a different notion than for other classes. These characters never live a life of ease and idleness. They are leaders through their prowess. Masters of conflict and Diplomacy, they must never appear weak before their clansmen lest they lose the precarious hold on the leadership of their people. In order to lead other barbarians, the noble must prove himself in the world, gaining renown through conquest and battle. Thus, these barbarians break away from the responsibilities of being the head of their clan and commit to a life of adventure and glory. One day, when skalds sing of his deeds, he will return and seize his rightful place as
chieftain of his tribe.

Adventuring: Glory is the sole motivator for the barbarian noble. He feels the need to establish himself amongst his peers and so he will undertake impossible tasks to heap fame upon fame onto his name. This need drives him to take incredible risks, for the reward is greater in the end. Other nobles leave their clans in disgrace, vowing to restore honour to their family name. Some even leave their people in lieu of accepting the responsibility of ruling. These warriors feel great shame and thereby fight even harder than most, as they have something to prove to themselves.

Roleplaying: Regardless of the noble’s motivation for leading a life of high adventure, he is the antithesis of the nobility of civilised cultures. While others embrace luxury, the barbarian noble disdains it, forcing himself to live a brutal life of deprivation. He prefers to stare into the night sky than enjoy the finery of silken sheets and a lusty maid. He may only assume the full stature of his position when he feels he has adequately proved he is deserving of his title. Humbler than most, open to suggestions, he is a true leader. He leads with the assistance of others rather than by his own ability.

Benefits: As a leader of men, the noble must be able to convey his wishes effectively and concisely. Thus, Bluff and Diplomacy are class skills for the Noble barbarian. In addition, when he reaches 6th level, he gains Leadership as a bonus feat, thus representing his increased renown.

Penalties: The noble barbarian is ill-equipped for treachery as it is beneath his station. His blind adherence to honour disallows the Uncanny Dodge Reflex bonus against Traps. In addition, his upbringing alters the very nature of his class, incorporating the variant rules found in SRD. At first level, he is an apprentice in both aristocrat and barbarian. He must choose the D8 Hit Die; he receives the entire list of weapon and armour skills available to both classes and receives skill points as if he were a fully-fledged barbarian. When he accumulates enough experience points to achieve 2nd level, he is first level in both classes. Add this line to the Apprentice-Level Characters table in SRD.

Class
Base Attack Fort Save Ref Save Will Save Special
Aristocrat +0 +0 +0 +1

Quester

The Quintessential Barbarian
Author Robert Schwalb
Series Quintessential Series
Publisher Mongoose Publishing
Publish date 2003
Pages 128
ISBN 1-903980-92-5
OGL Section 15 qbbn
Content Puller {$content}

Netbook can be found on the following website

The Grand OGL Wiki

The material below is designated as Open Game Content

The rite of passage is an important ceremony for many cultures. It demonstrates the commitment one is willing to make to achieve full membership of the clan. In the case of the quester, the barbarian seeks to become a warrior in the service of a great lord. Before he can achieve this goal, he must face countless trials and combats. Usually his quest is a search for a particular boon he can bring back to his lord and achieve the full benefits of membership.

Hence, he departs from his homeland to find this artifact or die trying, for surrendering prevents him from achieving his ultimate goal. Each quester seeks something different, whether it is a feather from the phoenix, or simply Climbing the trunk of the world tree to pluck a piece of fruit for his lord. He must always give the object of his quest to his lord. Once done, he will be forever in the graces of his master and gain favour, riches and power or even forgiveness for a past misdeed.

Adventuring: The promise of getting into his lord’s favour is the ultimate reason for his adventures. He will often ally himself with other adventurers, as long as they never interfere with his attempt to complete the quest he set out to do. Every step of his journey is one step closer to the completion of his epic quest. Thus, he will view simple dungeon crawls, the saving of towns, cities, dragon slayings and other such adventures as stepping stones to his goal. When he finally reaches his final destination, he will never allow any to assist him in its achievement, thus divorcing himself from his allies until the mission is complete.

Role-playing: The quester enjoys the company of other warriors of a similar mind. He is competitive and driven, although he
will be friendly to those who will assist him. Whenever he receives a clue or a lead to his goal, his countenance and persona animate
more than any other time. Once on the path, he is obsessed with reaching his destination, not stopping until it is completed.

Benefits: Thanks to his unswerving loyalty to his lord and his quest, he receives Endurance as a bonus feat at first level. In addition, he receives a +2 competence bonus on all Survival checks to sense direction.

Penalties: His obsession with his goal makes him rather one-dimensional. He can have a difficult time holding conversations relating to matters outside of his particular goal or quest. Most of his views include some aspect of his lord’s superiority over other men. For these reasons, questers suffer a -2 competence penalty to all Charisma-based skill checks.

Raider

Nicholas Roerich "Guests from Overseas". Date 1901

Nicholas Roerich "Guests from Overseas". Date 1901

The Quintessential Barbarian
Author Robert Schwalb
Series Quintessential Series
Publisher Mongoose Publishing
Publish date 2003
Pages 128
ISBN 1-903980-92-5
OGL Section 15 qbbn
Content Puller {$content}

Netbook can be found on the following website

The Grand OGL Wiki

The material below is designated as Open Game Content

Prowling the coastlines of nations, these thieves of the seas make their living preying upon the fat of the wealthy. Violent and savage, raiders are the curse of the erudite and educated. No one is truly safe from the raider's depredations. They strike without warning, burning and looting, taking what they want and destroying the rest. Their hunger for spoils consumes them, making them the worst of pirates. They are destroyers and haters of the soft and weak.

Having little respect for others’ possessions, they fall upon monasteries killing the inhabitants, burning the churches to the ground. They steal maidens for their depraved pleasures and kill them when they are done. These fiends have no moral fibre. Yet, they are the ultimate adventurer, braving any threat, facing inclement weather, to take what they want as often as they like.

Adventuring: Adventure fills the life of the raider. Every port is a place of new excitement. raiders journey to new lands, wage war and despoil what is left. Among adventurers, raiders are powerful warriors, decent thieves and excellent at infiltration. They never take orders well, preferring to follow their own lead. Losing their brethren in a poorly planned raid is one of the many reasons why raiders join adventuring parties.

Roleplaying: raiders are the consummate scum. They have no respect for anyone or anything. They tolerate other members of their party, restraining the urge to take what they want at their whim. Although not the best of companions, what they lose in practical understanding they more than make up for in their abilities. Once engaged in an attack, infiltration or any other type of assault they are all-professional. On the seas, they are sailors unmatched. If their allies can tolerate them between adventures, they might make a fine addition to any party.

Benefits: raiders gain Sneak Attack +1d6 at every level they would otherwise gain Damage Reduction due to their naturally deceptive and piratical leanings. Therefore, at 11th level, the raider gains Sneak Attack +1d6. At 14th, the bonus dice increases to +2d6. This ability continues to 20th level. Sneak Attack damage stacks with Sneak Attack damage derived from other classes. In all respects, this ability conforms to the rules governing Sneak Attack as defined in the SRD. raiders gain the following as class skills: Balance (Dexterity), Bluff (Dexterity) and Profession (sailor) (Wisdom).

Penalties: In exchange for the ability to cause additional damage on the unsuspecting, the raider loses the Damage Reduction class ability of the barbarian and the enhanced movement of the barbarian class. raiders lose the following as class skills: Craft, Handle Animal and Ride.

Stoic Warrior

The Quintessential Barbarian
Author Robert Schwalb
Series Quintessential Series
Publisher Mongoose Publishing
Publish date 2003
Pages 128
ISBN 1-903980-92-5
OGL Section 15 qbbn
Content Puller {$content}

Netbook can be found on the following website

The Grand OGL Wiki

The material below is designated as Open Game Content

Howling fury, violent outbursts and a bloodthirsty appetite for carnage typically define the barbarian. They become unstoppable killing machines. When angered, they are stronger, tougher and generally nastier. The stoic warrior on the other hand controls his anger and in exchange for its benefit, he channels it into combat prowess. These barbarians come from similar savage settings, but they are more controlled and thereby more dangerous. Stoic warriors are exceedingly rare. They are an advanced form of barbarian, whose use of feats is almost as impressive as a fighter. Most speak of them as legends, great heroes who lead hordes of screaming barbarians to despoil the lands of comfort, sowing destruction whenever they appear.

Adventuring: The stoic warrior seems to be an average barbarian, although disciplined beyond compare. In fact, his discipline makes him unique. He will travel throughout the lands, always searching to better himself, to hone his skills as a warrior. He will sometimes join a band of adventurers who are likeminded, exhibiting the same self-restraint as himself. While he recognises the value of the rage employed by most other barbarians, he never releases it himself. Stoic Warriors will often accompany druids for they usually share a similar outlook.

Roleplaying: Stern and aloof, the stoic warrior maintains a constant separation from his companions. He disdains rash behaviour and readily criticises outbursts. He respects ordered fighting, calm and rational thought and, above all else, a level-headed approach to problem solving. The inverse of all expectations, he throws most off kilter. Considering his unusual personality and outlook, many
adventurers fear him as something other than what he seems. Nothing could be further from the truth.

Benefits: Stoic warriors have learned to use their rage in a more productive manner, so they receive a bonus feat whenever they would otherwise receive a feature of the Rage ability. Thus, they gain a bonus fighter feat at 1st, 4th, 8th, 12th, 15th, 16th and 20th levels. They also enjoy a good Will save, beginning with a +2 at first level and gaining improvements in this saving throw as a wizard does as described in the SRD.

Penalties: Stoic warriors do not ever lose control. Therefore, they lose the ability to Rage. Furthermore, it takes a lot of willpower to resist losing control. Their internal struggle prevents them from gaining the ‘good’ Fortitude save. Instead, their Fortitude Save progresses as a wizard. Stoic Warriors must be lawful. If they ever deviate from this alignment, they immediately become an ex-barbarian and may never progress further in this class.

Thug

The Quintessential Barbarian
Author Robert Schwalb
Series Quintessential Series
Publisher Mongoose Publishing
Publish date 2003
Pages 128
ISBN 1-903980-92-5
OGL Section 15 qbbn
Content Puller {$content}

Netbook can be found on the following website

The Grand OGL Wiki

The material below is designated as Open Game Content

Not all barbarians come from wilderness regions, some even hail from cities. The thug might have been overlooked, a miscreant who never learned the intricacies of human interaction, barbaric more in his lack of comprehension than his appearance. These bravos hire themselves out on the streets, usually in service to a thieves’ guild for their muscle. Bodyguards, toughs or even simple muggers are the usual money-making occupations thugs enjoy. Having little in the way of virtue and no interest in changing their ways makes
them despicable in most circles.

Adventuring: Whether the character is simply an idiot or just an anti-intellectual, the thug will happily undertake almost any quest – provided the money is good, the women are available and the ale free flowing. Thugs make the perfect frontline warrior as they are easy to exploit and appear to be extremely expendable. Out of necessity, these barbarians will do the nasty jobs – murder, extortion, enforcement and slaving. These jobs make them difficult companions for those of a higher moral calibre.

Roleplaying: The thug is the paradigmatic example of misplaced vanity. Arrogant to a fault, he never recognises the hurt he inflicts, the needless suffering. He is completely selfish, albeit in a stupid manner. Respecting power and strength, and understanding abuse, he will usually latch onto a powerful member of the party and serve as his lackey. Despite all of his failings, he can even mean well, albeit in a misguided manner, sometimes performing acts of amazing charity, as if somewhere in the dark recesses of his mind there lurks a conscience.

Benefits: The thug relies upon his strength to carry him through life. He may rage one extra time per day for a number of rounds equal to 5 + his newly-modified Constitution score.

Penalties: Ignorance is bliss. The thug may not take ranks in Intelligence-based skills. Furthermore, he suffers a -2 competence penalty to all Intelligence based checks. In addition, he cannot be of a good alignment and, should he become so, he loses the benefits listed above while retaining these penalties.

grey line

To Barbarian

The Worlds of Mankind is owned and created by Mark John Goodwin

The text on this page is Open Game Content, and is licensed for public use under the terms of the Open Game License v1.0a.

‘d20 System’ and the ‘d20 System’ logo are trademarks of Wizards of the Coast, Inc.
and are used according to the terms of the d20 System License version 6.0.
A copy of this License can be found at www.wizards.com/d20.