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Black Hills

Inyan Kara is a sacred mountain to Lakota.

Inyan Kara is a sacred mountain to Lakota.

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

The Black Hills are a small, isolated mountain range rising from the Great Plains of North America in western South Dakota and extending into Wyoming, USA. Set off from the main body of the Rocky Mountains, the region is somewhat of a geological anomaly—accurately described as an "island of trees in a sea of grass." The Black Hills are home to the tallest peaks of continental North America east of the Rockies.

Native Americans have inhabited the area since at least 7000 B.C. The Arikara arrived by 1500 A. D., followed by the Cheyenne, Crow, Kiowa and Pawnee. The Lakota arrived from Minnesota in the eighteenth century and drove out the other tribes, claiming the land, which they called Paha Sapa, for themselves.

It has been rumoured they contain vast amouts of gold.

Devils Tower National Monument

Devils Tower, Wyoming. Taken by Andrew Yool on the 4th of September 2003.

Devils Tower, Wyoming. Taken by Andrew Yool on the 4th of September 2003.

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Devils Tower is a monolith (more technically, an igneous intrusion) or volcanic neck located near Hulett and Sundance in Crook County, northeastern Wyoming, above the Belle Fourche River. It rises dramatically 1267 feet (386 m) above the surrounding terrain. Located at 44°35?26?N, 104°42?56?W, the summit is 5112 feet (1558 m) above sea level.

Tribes including the Arapaho, Crow, Cheyenne, Kiowa, Lakota, and Shoshone have had cultural and geographical ties to the monolith long before European and early American immigrants reached Wyoming. Their names for the monolith include: Aloft on a Rock (Kiowa), Bear's House (Cheyenne, Crow), Bear's Lair (Cheyenne, Crow), Bear's Lodge (Cheyenne, Lakota), Bear's Lodge Butte (Lakota), Bear's Tipi (Arapaho, Cheyenne), Tree Rock (Kiowa), and Grizzly Bear Lodge (Lakota).

Native American folklore

American Indian legends tell of six Sioux girls who were picking flowers when they were chased by bears. Feeling sorry for them, the Great Spirit raised the ground beneath the girls. The bears tried to Climb the rock, but fell off, leaving their scratch marks on the sides.

Another version tells of how two Sioux boys wandered far from their village when Mato the bear, a huge creature that had claws the size of teepee poles, spotted them, and wanted to eat them for breakfast. He was almost upon them when the boys prayed to Wakan Tanka the Creator to help them. They rose up on a huge rock, while Mato tried to get up from every side, leaving huge scratch marks as he did. Finally, he sauntered off, disappointed and discouraged. Wanblee, the eagle, helped the boys off the rock and back to their village.

The Tower is sacred to several Native American Plains tribes, including the Lakota Sioux, Cheyenne and Kiowa.

Dinetah

Petroglyph representation of a Navajo deity at an archaeological site in the Dinetah. Largo Canyon area, New Mexico.

Petroglyph representation of a Navajo deity at an archaeological site in the Dinetah. Largo Canyon area, New Mexico.

Dinetah is the traditional homeland of the Navajo tribe of Native Americans. The exact boundaries are marked by mountain peaks which correspond to the four directions.

Geography/Topography

The Dinetah region is marked by high mesas and deep canyons that drain to the San Juan River. The canyons of the area are composed of irregular layers of sandstone, marked by multiple benches and talus slopes. Elevations average approximately 5,000 to 6,500 feet, with a few mountain peaks rising to more than 14,000 feet.

The traditional boundary of the land is demarcated by four mountains: Blanca Peak to the east, Mount Taylor to the south, the San Francisco Peaks to the west, and Hesperus Peak to the north.

While the Dinetah generally refers to a large geographical area, the heart of the region is regarded to be the canyons of the Largo and Carrizo washes, south of the San Juan River in New Mexico. These canyons are located to the east and south of Farmington, New Mexico, and include Blanco, Largo, Carrizo and Gobernador Canyons.

The cultural significance of the Dinetah is documented throughout Navajo oral history, and is supported by numerous archaeological and rock art sites. According to Navajo tradition, the infant Changing Woman (Asdza;a;n nádleehé), one of the best known Navajo deities, was found by the Holy People (Díyín diné’é) on top of Gobernador Knob, located within the Dinetah area. The region is also indicated as the place to which the first four Navajo clans arrived after their migration from the western ocean.

Mount Katahdin

Mount Katahdin, the highest peak in Maine, the centerpiece of Baxter State Park, and the Northern Terminus of the Appalachian Trail. Author TJ aka Teej

Mount Katahdin, the highest peak in Maine, the centerpiece of Baxter State Park, and the Northern Terminus of the Appalachian Trail. Author TJ aka Teej

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Mount Katahdin is the highest mountain in Maine. Called Katahdin by people local to the peak and by the Penobscot Indians: the term means "The Greatest Mountain". It is located in east central Piscataquis County northwest of Millinocket. It divides the East and West Branches of the Penobscot River.

On the sides of Katahdin are four glacial cirques carved into the granite by alpine glaciers and in these cirques behind moraines and eskers are several picturesque ponds. Katahdin is one of the best sites to view glacial effects in the Eastern States. From the low lake country to the south and east, the mountain appears to be one of the tallest and most abrupt in the Appalachian Mountains.

Fauna includes bears, deer and moose as well as swarms of bloodthirsty black flies and mosquitos. Among the birds are various songbirds and raptors.

It was believed to be the home of the storm god Pamola, and thus an area to be avoided.

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