Places

To Practoria

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Rome

Rome possibly one the most advanced cities on the Planet

Lake Nemi

Painting by John Robert Cozens (c. 1777)

Painting by John Robert Cozens (c. 1777)

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Lake Nemi is a small circular volcanic lake in the Lazio region of Italy south of Rome, taking its name from Nemi, the largest town in the area, that overlooks it from a height. It has a surface of c. 1.67 km² and a maximum depth of 33 meters.

Above the Lake stands a grove sacred to the goddess Diana. From Diana's sanctuary a stream descends to Nemi, haunted by the water-nymph Egeria in league with a Rex Nemorensis, "Ruler of Woodlands".

Egeria's stream to Nemi thus invokes fountains and wellsprings of Earth Goddesses' ever-flowing ruby-elixir prophecies fulfilled in Roman Emperors as godheads.

Emperors Caligula and Tiberius sailed Lake Nemi not merely to cool off in summer, but to assert themselves as Nemorensi, rulers aligning with the Stars, wedded to Earth's perpetual life-force.

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The Senate Building

Building set up as a meeting place for the most powerful men in practoria called the Senate

This is made up of leading citizens and when they meet, the Senate discuss issues such as proposed new laws, financial issues affecting Practoria etc. There were about 300 men in the Senate. They were usually from rich noble families and what they think goesa long way to determining Practorian law.

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The Cicus Maximus

Place of chariot racing

The Colosseum

The Colosseum

Place of Gladitorial Games

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Tarpeian Rock

Tarpeian Rock

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

The Tarpeian Rock is a steep cliff of the southern summit of the Capitoline Hill, overlooking the Forum in Rome. Which is used as an execution site, murderers and traitors, if convicted they are flung from the cliff to their deaths.

History

When Titus Tatius attacked Rome after the Rape of the Sabines, the Vestal Virgin Tarpeia, daughter of Spurius Tarpeius, governor of the citadel on the Capitoline Hill, betrayed the Romans by opening the city gates for the Sabines in return for 'what they bore on their arms.' She believed that she would receive their golden bracelets. Instead, the Sabines crushed her to death with their shields, and she was thrown from the rock which now bears her name.

About 500 BC, Lucius Tarquinius Superbus, the seventh legendary king of Rome, leveled the top of the rock, removing the shrines built by the Sabines, and built the Temple of Jupiter Capitolinus on the intermontium, the area between the two summits of the hill. The rock itself survived this remodelling, being used for executions well into Sulla's time.

To be hurled off the Tarpeian rock was, in some sense, a fate worse than death, because it carried with it a stigma of shame. The standard method of execution in ancient Rome was by strangulation in the Tullianum. Rather, the rock was reserved for the most notorious traitors, and as a place of unofficial, extra-legal executions (for example, the near-execution of then-Senator Gaius Marcus Coriolanus by a mob whipped into frenzy by a tribune of the plebs).

To Practoria

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