Copper Age 7000

7000 : ancient Mesopotamians (“between the rivers”) developed the first large populated permanent settlements (such as Jarmo and Jericho); they lived in mud brick multi-room houses with mud ovens, used pottery, traded with other villages in the fertile crescent, and domesticated goats, sheep, and pigs.

c. 7000 BC: Khasathut, decadent sixth pharaoh of the Second Dynasty of Khem, is overthrown by Khai, a probable descendant of the Vanir. Khai brings about the Third Dynasty of Khem. However, the country has been doomed by the sorcerous battle with Khasathut to become a desert.

6,000 – Cataclysm in Bimini.

6000 : the Hassuna cultures lived in organized villages with a social courtyard containing a religious shrine, surrounded by mud brick houses, and around the villages were five foot thick walls with community grain or water storage towers; they introduced irrigation for farming, canals for trade, decorated pottery, and lead or copper beads.

5500 : Agriculture started in Ancient Egypt.

5500 : the Halafian cultures were the first to specialize labor and have cobblestone roads; they were the first to use the potter’s wheel and the Kiln to make pottery with brilliantly colored realistic pictures and shapes.

c. 5000 BC: E-poh, leader of the Tcho-Tcho of the Plateau of Sung, is born.

5000 – Beginning of agriculture in the Tehuacán Valley matorral.

4500-2500 : Tenerians culture, colonized the region in present Niger

c. 4200 BC: The Seven Cryptical Books of Hsan are translated into ancient Chinese.

4000 : Syrian and Arabian nomads raided southern Mesopotamia, they were eventually absorbed into the Ubadian population.

c. 4000 BC: The Seven Books of Tan, which may be one and the same as the Seven Cryptical Books of Hsan, date back to this time.

4000-3200: the Ubaidian cultures made pottery decorated with wave patterns using the potter’s wheel; they established many farming settlements including Eridu, Uruk, Adab, Isin, Kish, Kullab, Lagash, Larsa, Nippur, and Ur. They lived in lower Mesopotamia.

The Ubaidian settlements emerged as small village communities in the foothills surrounding great river valleys; because they lived close to each other the control over water streams, harvest, and domestication became easier to control and caused increased food production.

4000 : Syrian and Arabian nomads raided southern Mesopotamia, they were eventually absorbed into the Ubadian population.

4000-3200: the Ubaidian cultures made pottery decorated with wave patterns using the potter’s wheel; they established many farming settlements including Eridu, Uruk, Adab, Isin, Kish, Kullab, Lagash, Larsa, Nippur, and Ur. They lived in lower Mesopotamia.

The Ubaidian settlements emerged as small village communities in the foothills surrounding great river valleys; because they lived close to each other the control over water streams, harvest, and domestication became easier to control and caused increased food production.

As food production increased it was able to supply larger communities and the villages grew into cities, civilization first emerged; cities were the foundation of civilization because with them came other civilizing elements including religious cults, political systems, written language, and monumental architecture.

4000 – years ago. Domestication of the horse

4000 – In Brittain earliest-known Druidic camps or communities appear.

3600 – years ago. In Egypt, mummification around this time in Hierankopolis.

3700 – Beginning of the Early Minoan period on Crete

3500 – the Sumerians, a nomadic people from the Armenian Plateau northeast of Mesopotamia, migrated into Mesopotamia and intermingled with the population; they brought with them horse-drawn chariots and metallurgy used to make copper helmets and spears.

Under the Sumerians the old cities developed into city-states, governed by a theocratic assembly of priests and, because priests knew what the gods “wanted,” they were very influential to the city-states; religion was also important in architecture because the most important building in each city-state was the ziggurat, the temple (or home) of the patron god of that city-state.

The Sumerian city-states were in constant competition with each other, even if by war; despite wars, the governments of the city-states generally maintained friendly relations because, they as aristocrats, held a special bond as the elite of a people who shared a common religion, language, and culture.

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