god Efnysien

Efnisien sacrifices himself to destroy the cauldron of rebirth. Date 1906 Author T. Prytherch
Efnisien sacrifices himself to destroy the cauldron of rebirth. Date 1906 Author T. Prytherch

Efnysien is a sadistic anti-hero in Wales and is largely responsible for the destruction of both Ireland and the Island of the Mighty. He is the son of Euroswydd and Penarddun, twin brother to Nisien, and half-brother to Brân, Manawydan and Branwen. The Welsh Triads call Lly^r one of the Three Exalted Prisoners of Britain for his captivity at Euroswydd’s hands; this is likely to a lost tradition of the birth of Penarddun’s younger sons.

Role in Welsh tradition

The Irish king Matholwch sails to Harlech to speak with Bran the Blessed high king of the Island of the Mighty and to ask for the hand of his sister Branwen in marriage, thus forging an alliance between the two islands. Bendigeidfran agrees to Matholwch’s request, but the celebrations are cut short when Efnysien, a half-brother to the children of Lly^r, brutally mutilates Matholwch’s horses, angry that his permission was not sought in regards to the marriage. Matholwch is deeply offended until Bran offers him compensation in the form of a magic cauldron that can restore the dead to life. Pleased with the gift, Matholwch and Branwen sail back to Ireland to reign.

Once in Matholwch’s kingdom, Branwen gives birth to a son, Gwern, but Efnysien’s insult continues to rankle among the Irish and, eventually, Branwen is mistreated, banished to the kingdom and beaten every day. She tames a starling and sends it across the Irish Sea with a message to her brother Bendigeidfran, who sails from Wales to Ireland to rescue her with his brother, Manawydan and a huge host of warriors. The Irish offer to make peace and build a house big enough to entertain Bendigeidfrân but hang a hundred bags inside, supposedly containing flour but actually containing armed warriors. Efnisien, suspecting treachery, reconnoitres the hall and kills the warriors by crushing their skulls. Later, at the feast, Efnisien, again feeling insulted, murders Gwern by burning him alive, and, as a result, a vicious battle breaks out. Seeing that the Irish are using the cauldron to revive their dead, he hides among the Irish corpses and is thrown into the cauldron by the unwitting enemy. He destroys the cauldron from within, sacrificing himself in the process.

Only seven men survive the conflict, among them Manawydan, Taliesin and Pryderi fab Pwyll, prince of Dyfed, Branwen having herself died of a broken heart. The survivors are told by a mortally wounded Bran to cut off his head and to return it to Britain. For seven years the seven survivors stay in Harlech, where they are entertained by Bendigeidfran’s head, which continues to speak. They later move on to Gwales  where they live for eighty years without perceiving the passing of time. Eventually, Heilyn fab Gwyn opens the door of the hall facing Cornwall and the sorrow of what had befallen them returns. As instructed they take the now silent head to the Gwynfryn, the “White Hill” (thought to be the location where the Tower of London now stands), where they bury it facing France so as to ward off invasion.

Relics & Rituals: Excalibur

© 2004 White Wolf Publishing, Inc. Distributed for Sword and Sorcery Studios by White Wolf Publishing, Inc.

By Evan Jamieson, Lizard, Aaron Rosenberg, Christina Stiles and Relics & Rituals: Excalibur team
Full netbook can be found on the followng website

Scribd. Relics & Rituals: Excalibur

The Spiteful, is a malcontent among gods. He once strove to be recognized as a great war god, but was outdone by Taran and Aeron. Now he serves as a god of strife who antagonizes peaceful people; Efnisien takes no pleasure in the valor of warriors, but delights in the spectacle of ordinary folk fighting and killing one another. He is said to ride a chariot drawn by eight bloody cats, the fastest vehicle known to the gods. His symbol is a broken wheel, and his favored weapon is the heavy flail.